Beyond London: Quaint Quebec House in Kent

Tucked away in Westerham, Kent, the next adventure in my ‘Beyond London’ series takes me to the Georgian style Quebec House. Known for being the childhood home of General James Wolfe – who was the victor of the Battle of Quebec – the house has had a colourful history. Built in the 1500s, it has been used as a school as well as being rented to the parents of General Wolfe. Originally built between 1530 and 1550, the first building was an L-shaped timber-framed house. The 1630s saw its layout change to a ‘double pile’ house, which was in fashion at the time.

Quebec House
Quebec House
Quebec House

Back in 1726 Edward Wolfe and his bride rented the house, although back then it was called Spiers. Fast forward a year and their son James is born – however, at the age of 32, he died as a hero in the Battle of Quebec – which led to the house being renamed in his honour. James Wolfe was always destined to be a soldier, right from an early age when at 14 he received his first commission. By the time he reached 22, he had been in battle four times and commanded his own regiment.

Quebec House
Quebec House

Wolfe was the commander of the army that was sent to capture Quebec and his army were victorious, but regretfully he paid the price. His tragic death was immortalised by Benjamin West and his historic painting became one of the most notable images of the time. This has cemented his place in British military history.

Wolfe Family Living Room
Wolfe Family Living Room
Wolfe Family Living Room
Wolfe Family Clock

By the 1880s, the house was divided into two with the Quebec House West being used as a school. The Canadian author Henry Beckles Wilson and his family lived within the house in 1911, before J. B. Learmong of Montreal acquired it and presented it to the National Trust – who own it today.

James Wolfe’s Clothing 
James Wolfe’s Clothing 
James Wolfe’s Clothing 
Wolfe Family Kitchen

Although one of the smallest National Trust properties, there really is an abundance of treasures and artefacts within it – each providing its own history and fascinating stories. From items of clothing to kitchen equipment and furniture, you get a real glimpse into how Quebec House looked in the past. The exterior of the house and its gardens illustrate the grandeur and quintessential Britishness you’d expect of a house in that era.

Wolfe Family Kitchen
Wolfe Family Kitchen
Wolfe Family Kitchen
Wolfe Family Kitchen – Complete with Mrs Wolfe’s Rich Cake Recipe

Hope you’ve enjoyed joining me on my journey around Quebec House and stay tuned for my next ‘Beyond London’ discovery. Thanks for reading and in the meantime, you can follow all my walks on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube – and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too so you don’t miss a post! Also, why not have a read of my other walks which explore all over London, from north to south, to west to east via central, there’s something there for you – and you can also read my very special walk of San Francisco too – and that’s not all – you can also listen to some of my walks on my London Wlogger podcast.

Here are the links to all my walks and podcasts:

Victoria to Green Park

Marble Arch to Mayfair

The Shard to Monument

King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath

Leadenhall Market to Old Spitalfields Market

Waterloo to The London Eye

St Paul’s Cathedral to Moorgate

Mile End Park to London Fields

Hyde Park Corner to Italian Gardens

Little Venice to Abbey Road

Regent’s Park to Soho Square

Clapham Common to The Albert Bridge

Grosvenor Gardens to Knightsbridge

Holland Park to Meanwhile Gardens

Hackney Downs to Springfield Park

Tower Bridge to Stave Hill

Shoreditch to Islington Green

Highgate to Finsbury Park

Ravenscourt Park to Wormwood Scrubs

Covent Garden to Southwark Bridge

Putney Bridge to Barnes Common

Westminster Abbey to Vauxhall Bridge

Crystal Palace Park to Dulwich Wood

Clapham Junction to Battersea Bridge

Norbury Park to Tooting Commons

Lesnes Abbey Woods to the Thames Barrier

Richmond Green to Wimbledon Common

Chiswick Bridge to Kew Green

Gladstone Park to Fryent Country Park

Whitehall to Piccadilly Circus

Tower of London to the Limehouse Basin

Ham Common to Hampton Court Bridge

The San Francisco Wlogger

The House Mill to Hackney Marshes

Twickenham Stadium to Crane Park Island

The Oval to Brockwell Park

Arnos Park to Trent Country Park

Blackheath to Mudchute Park & Farm

The Bridges of London (Part one) – Tower Bridge to Vauxhall Bridge

The Bridges of London (Part two) – Grosvenor Railway Bridge to Kew Bridge

The Bridges of London (Part three) – Richmond Lock and Footbridge to Hampton Court Bridge

15 of my Favourite Hidden Gems in London

The Historical and Modern Landmarks of London

Exploring Six of London’s Parks

Discovering Nine of London’s Commons

Introducing the London Wlogger Podcast

Episode 2: Tower Bridge to Stave Hill

Episode 3: Victoria to Green Park

Episode 4: Richmond Green to Wimbledon Common

Episode 5: Hyde Park Corner to Italian Gardens

Episode 6: Little Venice to Abbey Road

Episode 7: Waterloo to The London Eye

Episode 8: Highgate Wood to Finsbury Park

Episode 9: Regent’s Park to Soho Square

Episode 10: Hackney Downs and Springfield Park

Episode 11: The Shard to Monument

Episode 12: St Paul’s Cathedral to Moorgate

Episode 13: Gladstone Park to Fryent Country Park

Episode 14: Chiswick Bridge to Kew Green

Beyond London: Reigate Hill (Surrey)

Sources:

All photos taken by London Wlogger © Copyright 2021

Information about Quebec House: National Trust

8 thoughts on “Beyond London: Quaint Quebec House in Kent

  1. We walked around the site of the Battle of Quebec on the Plains of Abraham in Quebec City. It’s well annotated and a very interesting walk. We must visit this house next time we’re in UK. We enjoy building on the history we find out about on our travels.

    Liked by 1 person

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