Reaching 1,000 Subscribers: A Review of my Walks and an Insight into the London Wlogger

A few days ago I surpassed the dizzy heights of 1,000 subscribers! A MASSIVE thank you to everyone that follows my blog! So this week I’m doing something a little different and looking back on all of my previous walks over the past three months. Also I’m going to provide some useful insights behind my walks that you might not normally get to know from each of my routes!

1000

My walks have taken me to the parks, markets, squares, streets, bridges, and riverside views, whilst uncovering the capital’s true hidden gems! Here’s quick recap of them all!

Victoria to Green Park

My first walk visited some of the capital’s famous parks and palaces! My journey started at Victoria Station before heading to Buckingham Palace via St James’s Park and The Mall. I ended up at London’s smallest Royal Park, Green Park! Discover more of the journey and the history of these sights here – Victoria to Green Park.

Marble Arch to Mayfair

When I walked from Marble Arch to Mayfair I discovered some of London’s famous streets, namely Oxford Street, Regent’s Street and New Bond Street! Through the streets you come across two beautiful squares, Cavendish Square and Berkeley Square. A finish in the retro Shepherd Market in Mayfair is the perfect place to end a walk! Check out the full walk here – Marble Arch to Mayfair.

The Shard to Monument

Even though when you walk from The Shard to Monument it’s a short stroll, but you do see a lot! Going from The Shard takes you past Borough Market and Southwark Cathedral over London Bridge before you end at Monument! Fancy finding out more about each of their histories? Read the walk here – The Shard to Monument.

King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath

I’d have to say that one of my favourite walks I’ve done over the past few months is that of King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath! This is because it encompasses one of the loveliest walks along the Regent’s Canal and the wonderful view from Hampstead Heath across London. In between that you see many of London’s canal locks, including Camden Market, as well as hidden gems like the St Pancras Basin and Gas Holder No. 8! Perhaps my longest walk, but it’s definitely full of amazing sights! Check out all of them here – King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath.

Leadenhall Market to Old Spitalfields Market

If you want to see a mix of London’s renowned markets and modern day landmarks, then this is the walk for you! Beginning at the pretty Leadenhall Market you can take a wander past two iconic buildings of the London skyline, The Gherkin and The Cheese Grater, before going via London Liverpool Street Station. The markets keep coming as you go past both Petticoat Market and Old Spitalfields Market. See more of the walks wonders here – Leadenhall Market to Old Spitalfields Market.

Waterloo to The London Eye

A good walk in London has to begin somewhere and this one began at Waterloo, Britain’s busiest train station and ended at The London Eye, Britain’s busiest tourist attraction! The trip will take you to the distinctive bridges along the Thames, Waterloo Bridge, the Golden Jubilee Bridge and the Hungerford Bridge! All of the sights on my walk have their own fascinating tales, which you can find out more about here – Waterloo to The London Eye.

St Paul’s Cathedral to Moorgate

You don’t have to walk through a park or along the river to enjoy a great stroll in London! This walk explored the city centre perfectly by starting at the iconic St Paul’s Cathedral and going via Bank to The Royal Exchange, Mansion House and the Bank of England before finishing in Finsbury Circus in Moorgate! Explore its sights here – St Paul’s Cathedral to Moorgate.

Mile End Park to London Fields

Now as I mentioned earlier, I do love the Regent’s Canal and this walk once again illustrates London’s beauty perfectly! Beginning at the redeveloped Mile End Park you take a stroll along the canal via the stunning Victoria Park before finishing in the peaceful London Fields. Some great pics and history here – Mile End Park to London Fields

Hyde Park Corner to Italian Gardens

For my next walk I had the pleasure to see some of the capital’s watery wonders and amazing arches! I started my route at the Wellington Arch via Hyde Park and The Serpentine before passing by Henry Moore’s arch, and finishing in the ever so pretty Italian Gardens! If you enjoy gardens and water features, this is the one for you – Hyde Park Corner to Italian Gardens.

Little Venice to Abbey Road

London isn’t just famous for its tourist hot spots, there are many notable landmarks from the sporting and musical worlds! This walk featured two of them! Lord’s Cricket Ground and Abbey Road. But in addition to them, I walked through one of the cutest places in London, Little Venice and to two famous religious monuments, The Liberal Jewish Synagogue and St John’s Wood Church. A walk for those who enjoy cricket, music and pretty riverside walks – Little Venice to Abbey Road.

Regent’s Park to Soho Square

The Royal Parks of London are green areas of tranquility and beauty, and this walk started at one of the most picturesque places, Regent’s Park. After taking in its splendour I ventured via a London skyline icon in the BT Tower before finishing in the hidden Soho Square! A perfect short stroll – Regent’s Park to Soho Square

Clapham Common to The Albert Bridge

My most recent walk explored the ponds and parks of the south of London where I began at Clapham Common went via Battersea Park before ending at the splendid view on The Albert Bridge. One of London’s unknown walks, but it’s ever so wonderful – Clapham Common to The Albert Bridge

Well my twelve walks have certainly covered some distance in London, and explored so much beauty. Which one of them was your favourite? How many of them have you done? Please let me know in the comments section!

Insight into The London Wlogger

Now in the form of a Q&A, I’m going to give you all a bit more info on the inspiration behind the London Wlogger and some useful facts about it!

Do you do all your walks in one go? Or several trips?

One thing I found out was when I’m taking pics, notes, and trying to concentrate on all the different wonders of London I pass, it takes some time! So I can’t do all the walks in one day unfortunately! Also so far all the walks are being done during the autumn and winter, so I have to make sure I finish by sunset… not an easy task!

How long in advance do you do the walks before writing about them?

Now this is a bit of a secret behind the London Wlogger! But I do many walks in advance as I try to stay ahead of myself, so if we do have many weeks of bad weather, I might not be able to get out there and walk. So to avoid this I would’ve done a few walks before I post about them. For instance, as we speak, I’ve already completed and got pics for four week’s worth of posts!

Have you considered doing separate walks that are all connected into one?

I did! There are a few reasons why each week the routes are random, and not in the same area. Firstly, it keeps the audience guessing where the next route will be, one week I’m in Victoria, the next in Hampstead, quite the difference in distance!

Secondly, as all the walks are done in separate trips, it would mean I would have to start from a certain point each time. For instance, if my walk finished at Green Park, the next time I do a walk I would need to start from there.

Lastly, the best way to see London is to not restrict yourself to certain areas, but spread it out, which I hope makes a better series!

What’s your favourite place in London?

Oooo it has to be along the Regent’s Canal, and my favourite view is from Hampstead Heath!

How do you plan each route?

Many of the walks I do are ones that I’ve done many times, or discovered by just walking around London with no plan in place. However, as time has gone on, I’ve planned out routes based on a few factors. Firstly, what there is to see on it, such as landmarks, historical places, or natural beauty. Also how close each area is in proximity to each other, for instance, a walk from Bank to Camden is lovely, but a bit long for a short blog post! Finally, I try to spread out as much of London as possible, so I won’t stay in just Central, but go as far as the outskirts.

Where did the word ‘Wlogger’ come from?

One day I hope this features in the Oxford Dictionary! But the word ‘Wlogger’ is a play on ‘Walking Blogger = Wlogger’! Catchy and clever, but hard to say, think of Vlogger with a W!

What camera to use? Do you take all the pics?

I’d love to say some swanky, expensive camera brand… but it’s my little old iPhone 6s! And yep, the majority of the pics are taken by me, the only ones which aren’t would be inside areas I can’t access such as The Royal Festival Hall and a skyline view of a landmark like The Cheese Grater. All photos not taken by me are credited, but the majority are taken me!

Ever thought of going outside London?

Of course, who knows! I’d love to do more walks in Britain and perhaps further afield, watch this space…

Still want to ask me something? Write me a question in the comments section, and I’ll answer it!

I hope you’ve enjoyed reading a review of all my walks, and gaining a little bit more of an insight into the London Wlogger!

I’ll be back walking again next week, but in the meantime you can follow me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too!

See you soon!

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2017

Clapham Common to The Albert Bridge: Ponds, Parks and Picturesque Views

A warm welcome to you, and thanks for joining me on another walk around London! Throughout my walks of the capital I’ve explored many parks, and today I shall be exploring two of South London’s most wonderful natural spaces. My walk begins in Clapham Common takes me via Battersea Park before ending along the Thames at the splendid Albert Bridge.

I’ll admit I’d never actually been to either Clapham Common or Battersea Park before this walk, so for me it was even more exciting to do!

map1.png
Clapham Common to The Albert Bridge

My journey starts in Clapham Common which dates back to the late 17th century when the recreational area was used for horse racing and cricket. It wasn’t until the 1760s when a wealthy local resident by the name of Christopher Baldwin led an initiative to improve the Common by leveling it off and filling in its ditches and planting trees.

IMG_1021.JPG
Clapham Common

During the 19th century the Common was managed by a group of local trustees who continued to level it out and plant trees. As late as the 1920s sheep were still grazing on the Common, though it was now becoming a well-known area of leisure for people within the suburb which was growing both in size and wealth.

IMG_1027.JPG
Football Picthes on Clapham Common

However, in the 1860s Commons in London were at risk of being sold to developers as new legislation meant they could be purchased for the benefits of the public. In 1877, the Metropolitan Board of Works bought Clapham Common from its Manorial Owners with its aim to be ‘free and unenclosed forever’!

IMG_1045.JPG
Clapham Common

Both the board and its successor, the London County Council, continued to make improvements to it and in 1890 they responded to public demand to build one of the largest and best surviving Victorian bandstands in the country.

IMG_1042.JPG
Clapham Common Bandstand

During the First World War troops would be trained in digging trenches on the Common. Whilst in the Second World War the site was used for big events and housed an anti-aircraft battery, with bomb shelters being dug within it.

Sports facilities and entertainments continued on the Common after the War with the London County Council and its successor, the Greater London Council, making improvements to it. The Common was the venue for the International London Horse Show from 1954 to 1985. However, by the 1990s local residents became unhappy with the large scale concerts and other events which they thought were unsuited and damaging the local recreational space. Since 1971, the Common has been owned and managed by the London Borough of Lambeth.

Today, it’s 220 acres of wonderful grass areas, the lovely Mount Pond, many football pitches, and is one of London’s most famous Commons. I did love standing by the pond, with all you can hear is the sound of the birds and the wind, truly the definition of peaceful!

IMG_1046.JPG
Mount Pond
IMG_1048.JPG
Mount Pond
IMG_1053.JPG
Mount Pond

Opposite the Bandstand you’ll find the very popular and convenient La Baita, which in Italian means ‘the hut’. This cafe serves authentic Italian cuisine with sandwiches and drinks offered too. The perfect way to sit there and enjoy the Common on a sunny day.

IMG_1058.JPG
La Baita

Outside Clapham Common you’ll find the pretty St. Barnabas Church which was erected in 1897.

img_1019
St. Barnabas Church

It’s now time to continue my walk through Clapham Common and along the main road to Battersea Park.

img_1064
Leaving Clapham Common

Along my walk I go past Battersea Park train station, and this rather vintage railway bridge!

IMG_1078.JPG

IMG_1080 (2).jpg
Entrance to Battersea Park

Back in 1843 property developer Thomas Cubitt and the local vicar, the Honourable Reverend Robert Eden, reported to Queen Victoria’s Commison on improving the Metropolis. In 1846 an Act of Parliament was passed which gave to the authorisation of a formation of a park on part of Battersea Common and Battersea Fields.

IMG_1082.JPG
Scrubs of Battersea Park

A year before in 1845 architect James Pennethorne produced a preliminary layout of the park, but it wasn’t until 1854 when the main developments of the park took place. The park was formally opened to the public by Queen Victoria in 1858.

img_1086

Like with Clapham Common, the park was used during the First World War. Allotments were laid out in the park, an anti-aircraft station was set up on the croquet field, and a clothing depot was installed on one of the cricket fields. The park was also used during World War Two for an allotment, a piggery, an experimental radio station, and the running track became an anti-aircraft gun site. Today, the 200 acre park is managed by Wandsworth Council.

It’s not just Clapham Common that has a beautiful and picturesque pond, as Battersea Park has this amazing one too!

img_1089
IMG_1093.JPG

IMG_1097.JPG

Every pond should have somewhere to enjoy its splendour, and next to it you can relax in this riverside cafe!

IMG_1095.JPG

It’s only when you walk through the park that you find out how vast it is! Also the hidden gems within it keep appearing with more ponds and pathways filled with trees.

IMG_1103.JPG

IMG_1109.JPG

Near the northern side of the park sits the Festival Gardens that were designed by Russell Page. In 1951 they were transformed into the ‘Pleasure Gardens’ as part of the Festival of Britain which celebrated the British industry, arts and science to promote the feeling of recovery after the World War.

IMG_1116.JPG
Festival Gardens Today

The event was intended to be a one-off year exhibition, but the fun fair remained there as a permanent attraction until it closed in 1974.

IMG_1124.JPG

IMG_1145.JPG

One of the eye-catching features within the park is this cool metal structure!

IMG_1118.JPG

IMG_1122.JPG

At the end of Festival Gardens you find the distinctive and rather amazing structure of the Peace Pagoda. Regular London Wlogger readers will remember another Pagoda appearing in Victoria Park in one of my previous walks!

IMG_1129.JPG
Peace Pagoda

The construction of the Peace Pagoda actually relates to the unlikely town of Milton Keynes in the UK. Back in 1978, the Reverend Gyoro Nagase arrived in England from Japan to assist with the construction of the first Peace Pagoda in the UK in Milton Keynes. Now you might think, it’s very random for a famous Japanese religious monument to be in Milton Keynes, but there is logic behind it! Back in the seventies when the new town of Milton Keynes was being developed, one of the planning advisers had visited Sri Lanka where he saw a Peace Pagoda. It was proposed to the Milton Keynes Development Corporation who loved the idea, and it remains there today.

In 1984, Reverend Gyoro Nagase moved to London to assist with 50 volunteers and Buddhist monks and nuns of the Nipponzan Myohoji Buddhist Order to construct the Peace Pagoda in the park, and its amazing structure was completed in 1985.

IMG_1132.JPG

img_1134

img_1135
View from the Pagoda

To get to my final destination today I need to take a walk along the side of the Thames, and the view across it is simply stunning from the Peace Pagoda. You can tell I enjoyed taking videos on this walk!

img_1140

IMG_1139.JPG

A famous place for morning joggers and dog walkers, I walk along the side of the river to reach The Albert Bridge!

IMG_1159.JPG

Located over the River Thames connecting Chelsea on the north bank to Battersea on the south bank, the Albert Bridge was designed and built by Rowland Mason Ordish in 1873. However, it proved to be structurally unsound, so between 1884 and 1887 Sir Joseph Bazalgette incorporated design elements of a suspension bridge to it.

IMG_1161.JPG

Two concrete piers were added to it to further strengthen it in 1973, which means today the bridge is an odd hybrid of three different design styles! For six years after it was opened it became a toll bridge, though this was unsuccessful and the charge was lifted.

img_1167
End of the Bridge with the Old Tollbooths

The bridge was given the nickname of ‘The Trembling Lady’ as it had the tenancy to vibrate when large numbers of people walked across it. The entrance sign to warn troops from the nearby Chelsea Barracks is still there today.

IMG_1170.JPG

Today, there are still traffic control limits over it to prolong its life, making it the least busy of London’s bridges. The bold colouring of the bridge was painted on it in 1992 to make it more visible for ships, and I think you’d find it hard to miss it! At night the bridge is illuminated with 4,000 bulbs, and with Grade II listed status it’s one of the capital’s riverside icons.

The view from it you can imagine is amazing! On one side you can see the Chelsea Bridge, and on the other is Battersea Bridge.

IMG_1180.JPG
Across the Thames with Chelsea Bridge in the Distance
IMG_1185.JPG
Other side is Battersea Bridge

I couldn’t think of many nicer places to end a walking adventure of London! I’ve taken a trip through South London to visit a famous Common, Park and Bridge, and seen how the first two played their part in both World Wars. Hope you had a great time reading my walk, and please share your thoughts below! Whilst I have you here, you can give me a follow on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too!

I’ll see you next week!

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2017

History of Clapham Common – Clapham Common Management Advisory Committee 

History of St Barnabas Church – British History Online

History of Battersea Park – Historic England

History of the Festival of Britain – Historic UK

History of the Peace Pagoda – Battersea Park History 

History of The Albert Bridge – Transport Trust

Regent’s Park to Soho Square: London’s Prettiest Gardens

Greetings one and all! My walks have taken me to some of London’s most famous parks including Hyde Park, Green Park, and St James’s Park. Today, I visit another one of the capital’s beauty natural areas, Regent’s Park. From there I’ll go past the distinctive BT (British Telecom) Tower before ending in my final destination of Soho Square!

map1
Regent’s Park to Soho Square

My journey begins in one of London’s eight Royal Park, Regent’s Park. Designed by John Nash, the park covers 395 acres of land and includes the Queen Mary’s Gardens which features over 12,000 roses of 400 varieties!

IMG_0267.JPG
Queen Mary’s Gardens

Originally part of the vast Forest of Middlesex, known as Marylebone Park, in 1538 the land was seized by King Henry VII. He turned the 554 acres of land into a hunting chase, and for the next 50 years it became a place where the King and Queen would entertain visiting dignitaries.

img_0266
Queen Mary’s Gardens

However, between 1649 and 1660 after the Civil War, the Commonwealth Government under Oliver Cromwell chopped down many the park’s trees to help pay off the debts from the war. When Cromwell died, Charles II became King and the park returned to the crown. Over the next 150 years the land was leased out to tenant farmers as hunting had gone out of fashion.

IMG_0264.JPG
Waterfall within the Park

In 1811, there became a greater financial opportunity to start building on parkland than farming on it, and the new Prince Regent, later King George IV, wanted to take advantage of this. This lead to designs being produced for a new summer palace in the grounds.

The government architect, John Nash, was the man behind the redesigned park which was renamed Regent’s Park. The park featured a huge lake, canal, and the new royal residence. 56 villas and a series of grand regency terraces were built within the park by John Nash to pay for it.

IMG_0263.JPG

However, the Prince’s attention turned to improving Buckingham Palace, so the idea of a summer house didn’t materialise. Nor did the 56 villas either, as only 8 were built! The park was originally only exclusive for residents of the villas and terraces, but in 1835 it was open to the public!

IMG_0262.JPG

Like most of London during World War Two the park was bombed, with rubble from the buildings that were destroyed being dumped on the park’s lawns. In 1932, the Queen Mary’s Gardens opened to the public, with the rose gardens being completed in 1934.

Today, the beautiful rivers, scrubs, plants and fields provide a reminder of what it was like to be in Regency London. You do feel very lucky to have such stylish and peaceful gardens in London, as you feel like you’re in the countryside, not the centre of a city!

img_0254

IMG_0265.JPG

img_0258
Queen Mary’s Gardens

The park also features many sporting facilities with football and cricket pitches. It’s the perfect combination. On one part of the park you have the rivers and plants, and the other the sporting side of a park!

img_0251

The park also features the amazing Jubilee Gates which are made from iron and were installed to mark the Silver Jubilee of King George V, and the official opening of the Queen Mary’s Gardens in 1935. The gates have Grade II listed status and were donated by Sigismund Goetze who was a wealthy and successful artist that lived in Grove House on the northern perimeter of the park from 1909 to 1939.

IMG_0268.JPG
Jubilee Gates

I’d love to stay in the pleasant Regent’s Park, but I’ll continue my walk to Soho Square, and doing so I pass by one of the distinct buildings of the London skyline in Fitzrovia, the BT Tower.

Opened in 1965 by Prime Minster Harold Wilson, the BT Tower was built from 13,000 tonnes of steel and 4,600 square meters of glass. It was commissioned by the General Post Office to support microwave aerials carrying telecommunications transmissions from London to the rest of the country.

img_0275
BT Tower

Architects Eric Bedford and G.R.Yeats were the men behind its unique design, with a cylindrical shape chosen for it so the building wouldn’t shift no more than 20cm in the high winds. The aerials on the tower were originally designed to handle up to 150,000 simultaneous telephone conversations and 40 television channels! Imagine the demand for those aerials now if they were used for WiFi signals…!

img_0278

The tower stands at 189 metres high which at the time made it the tallest building in London until 1980, when the NatWest Tower overtook it. Today, it’s the 11th tallest building in the capital, and you do sometimes forget it’s there as more notable buildings like The Shard and The Cheesegrater in London get more attention! Over the years the tower has gone by many names including the Museum Tower, the Post Office Tower,  the London Telecom Tower, and currently the British Telecom (BT) Tower.

It was awarded Grade II listed status in 2003, and even today it’s still a major broadcasting and communications hub with most UK TV’s passing through it. Regularly fundraising events such as BBC Children in Need are still held there.

With great phone signal in the area by the BT Tower, I now move onto the final destination of today’s walk, Soho Square. Outside Soho Square stands St Patrick’s Church, which is a Roman Catholic Parish Church which was built between 1891 and 1893 and designed by John Kelly. The current structure had replaced an earlier and smaller chapel which was built by Father Arthur O’Leary in the 1790s.

IMG_0301.JPG
St Patrick’s Catholic Church

My journey ends in pretty Soho Square which dates back to 1670s and was formally known as King Square after Charles II.

img_0299
Soho Square

In the middle of the square sits a statue of Charles II which was carved by Danish sculptor Caius Gabriel Cibber in 1681. However, in 1875 when the square was altered it was removed from the square due to its poor state and it was given to artist Frederick Goodall. He placed the statue on the island in his lake at Grim’s Dyke until 1890 when dramatist W.S. Gilbert purchased the property. When Gilbert died in 1911, Lady Gilbert directed it to be returned to the square, and in 1938 it was restored into its original place.

img_0290
Charles II Statue

The picturesque Tudor-like hut in the middle surprisingly has only been there since 1925. During World War Two the hut was used as a bomb shelter with 12 inches of brick and a concrete roof to accommodate around 150 to 200 people. However, today I’d love to say there is a magical use for it, but alas, it’s now just a shed, filled with gardening tools to help keep the square looking lovely!

IMG_0298.JPG
Soho Square Hut

My walk has taken me from one of London’s most famous parks to a secret square via one of London’s tallest building. I hope you found the walk both enjoyable and fascinating, and I look forward to you joining me again next week! In the meantime, why not follow me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too.

See you soon!

Little Venice to Abbey Road: Sporting and Musical Landmarks

Welcome one and all 🙂 Last week my walk ended in Italian Gardens, and the theme of Italy continues as this week I start in Venice, well Little Venice! No Italian adventures just yet! I’ll then go along my favourite stretch of water, the Regent’s Canal, before going past The Liberal Jewish Synagogue and St John’s Wood Church. In between that I’ll be passing by Lord’s Cricket Ground and ending at a musical landmark, Abbey Road. So, let’s begin the journey!

mpp
Little Venice to Abbey Road

Located near Paddington and Maida Vale, Little Venice is a scenic and very picturesque riverside area. Its history can be traced back to the 1810s when a pool was created where the Regent’s Canal and the Paddington arm of the Grand Junction Canal met. Back then it was known as the Paddington Broadwater.

IMG_0470.JPG

.img_0483

There are a couple of accounts as to where the name ‘Little Venice’ was coined. One of which was from poet Lord Byron who compared this area of Paddington to Venice. An alternative origin came from another poet Robert Browning. He referenced it while living in nearby Warwick Crescent between 1862 and 1887. This lead to the island in the middle christened Browning’s Island. It wasn’t until after the Second World War that it became Venice, and the 1950s until it was known as Little Venice.

IMG_0480.JPG

The surrounding affluent area has large houses with notable residents including entrepreneur Richard Branson and singer Robbie Williams. Around Little Venice you can find riverside cafes and restaurants whist enjoying venues such as the Canal Cafe Theatre and the Puppet Theatre Barge.

IMG_0476.JPG
The Canal and River Trust Offices

By the bridge in Little Venice sits the offices of the Canal & River Trust who’re a charity that’s responsible for taking care of 2,000 miles of waterways across England and Wales. And who we have to provide great appreciation to for the wonderful canal walks we have within London!

From peaceful Little Venice I take a walk along the Regent’s Canal past the boats and bridges of London’s loveliest riverside views.

IMG_0487.JPG

img_0492

img_0499

Walking along this stretch of water you could easily feel like you’re in Amsterdam, with the picturesque plants and pathways. This is the kind of walk that you can enjoy on either a cold winter’s day, when I went on it, or just as much on a warm summer’s day. I think every great walk, not just in London, has to have some form of river or canal in it. Over the weeks and months that I’ve been walking, there have been, and will be, walks that form a lot of the Regent’s Canal. These have so far included King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath and Mile End Park to London Fields!

It’s time to say goodbye (not to the walk, don’t worry..!), but to my canal walk as I continue my journey to Abbey Road.  As I do this, I passed this beautiful estate in Maida Vale! Imagine living in or even opposite it!

img_0503

My walk takes me past this rather lovely and distinct building which is The Liberal Jewish Synagogue. Founded in 1911, it’s the oldest and largest Liberal Synagogue in the UK.

img_0564

Opposite it is probably the most famous cricket ground and well-known sporting venues in the world, Lord’s Cricket Ground! Now being a fan of cricket, this stop on my walk is extra special!

qg851483_393high
Photo credit: London Town

Known as the ‘Home of Cricket’, Lord’s Cricket Ground’s history can be traced back to 1787 when the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) was founded. Before a ground was built aristocrats and nobleman would play cricket in White Conduit Fields in Islington. However, as London’s population grew and the need for more space so crowds could watch them play, they approached White Conduit CC’s bowler, Thomas Lord. They asked him to create a new private ground.

lk270294_942long
Photo credit: London Town

Lord was an ambitious entrepreneur and leased a ground on Dorset Fields in Marylebone. It staged its first match between Middlesex and Essex on the 31st May 1787, and the Marylebone Cricket Club was formed. A year later the Laws of the Game were laid down, which notably referenced the size of the pitch (22 yards), and how players could be given out. Even today the MCC still remains in charge of the Laws of the Game across the entire world.

The MCC located to Marylebone Bank near Regent’s Park between 1811 and 1813, before moving to the ground we see today in St John’s Wood in 1814. Today, the ground is home to Middlesex County Cricket Club and hosts England national matches. It also hosts many corporate events as well as the game of Real Tennis.

Walking past the ground you see the W. G. Grace Memorial Gates which were erected in 1923, and gained Grade II listed status in 1996. Designed by architect Sir Herbert Baker they were a tribute to W.G. Grace, who is widely regarded as the pioneer of the game and one of the greatest ever players.

IMG_0511.JPG
W.G. Grace Memorial Gates

Along the outside of the ground you come to the Bicentenary Gates which were presented by the Duke of Westminster in memory of Viscount Cobham in 1987.

IMG_0520.JPG
Bicentenary Gates
IMG_0527.JPG
Lovely Wall Display Outside the Ground

From cricket to churches, as my walk takes me to St John’s Wood Church which was designed by architect Thomas Hardwick and completed in 1814. When the Church opened the celebrations were held within the new Pavilion at Lord’s Cricket Ground!

img_0556

Within the roundabout opposite the church sits the St Mary-le-Bone War Memorial which is a tribute to the men and women who sacrificed their lives in both World War One (1914-1918) and World War Two (1939-1945). The bronze statue is of St George in full armour on horseback slaying a dragon and was dedicated in 1936.

IMG_0537.JPG
Saint Mary-le-Bone War Memorial

It’s now time to move onto my final destination today, and quite possibly the world’s most famous crossing, Abbey Road! The Abbey Road Studios began their life as a sixteen-room house and were bought by EMI in 1929. They opened in 1931 with many different studios to accommodate all the varieties of musicians that used them, from orchestras, to string quarters, to soloists.

IMG_0581.JPG
Abbey Road Studios

The Beatles were signed by EMI’s Parlophone label in 1962, and made their first recording in the studios in the same year. Ninety percent of their recordings were done in the Abbey Road Studios. Other notable artists who recorded there were Pink Floyd, Cliff Richard, The Hollies, and even scores for four Star Wars films!

However, the studio only gained fame when The Beatles named their second-to-last album Abbey Road which was released in 1969. Its cover has become one of the world’s most recognisable images. This iconic image sees  John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr walking across the zebra crossing outside the studio.

Originally, the plan for the album cover was to charter a private jet to the Himalayas and shoot it at foothills of Mount Everest. However, EMI were so desperate to get the product out they went for a simple option of doing the image outside the studios. The photo was taken by Iain Macmillan on a ladder in the middle of the street whilst a policeman stopped traffic.

It was photographed at 11.30AM on the 8th August 1969, taking 10 minutes to do! Far more cheaper and simpler than their original plan! Did you know that six photos were taken, and it was the fifth one that was used. Also the guy in the background by the car was an American tourist called Paul Cole, who didn’t even know it was The Beatles!

abbey-road
The Famous Cover (Photo Credit: The Beatles)

In 2010, however, the cash-strapped EMI were considering selling the studios, but a few days later it was awarded Grade II historical status to help preserve it. Today, the crossing is a huge tourist attraction with many taking photos of themselves walking across it like the Fab Four did. And whilst I was there taking my pics, many frustrated drivers went past with people standing in the middle of the road! It’s a strange feeling when you’re there as you don’t really feel like you’re next to a historical landmark, but its musical significance is massive.

IMG_0567.JPG
The Abbey Road Zebra Crossing
IMG_0580.JPG
The Wall Outside the Studios
IMG_0585.JPG
The Abbey Road Street Sign near the Studios

It has been a walk where I’ve seen the beauty of Little Venice and stopped by landmarks of the sporting and music world’s! I hope you had a great time joining me on my walk, and please let me know your thoughts below, I’d love to hear them! For more of the London Wlogger you can give me a follow on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too 🙂

Stay tuned for another walk through London next week!

Hyde Park Corner to Italian Gardens: Arches and Watery Wonders

There’s nothing quite like walking through a park and along a river, and today I’ll be visiting some of London’s best green spaces!

My route begins at Hyde Park Corner where I’ll visit the Wellington Arch and the Apsley Gate, before heading to Hyde Park and the beautiful lakes at the Serpentine. From there I go past the Serpentine Sackler Gallery and another famous arch, then I’ll end my journey in one of London’s great hidden gems, Italian Gardens! So, boots on, let’s do some walking!

map
Hyde Park Corner to Italian Gardens

I start at the Wellington Arch, which is located near Hyde Park Corner tube station. Built between 1825 and 1827, the arch was designed by Decimus Burton and has been in its current position since the 1880s. Just like Marble Arch, it was intended to be located at the front of Buckingham Palace.

However, in 1828 with it nearing completion, the cost of the arch had exceeded the budget, and the Treasury declined to pay for the sculpture, as most of their funds had been used to rebuild Buckingham Palace, which itself had run hugely over budget! During this time committees were formed to commemorate two great heroes; Nelson and Wellington. Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square was completed, though the Wellington Memorial was less fortunate.

archh.jpg
The original arch (Photo credit: English Heritage)

In May 1838 sculptor Matthew Cotes Wyatt erected the largest equestrian statue on the arch. Although this caused controversy as it was disproportionate to the size of the arch itself, and the Government demanded it to be taken down.

arch
The Wellington Arch Today

The arch was dismantled in 1883 and rebuilt on its present site in 1885, however, after its relocation the arch still had no sculpture on top of it. In 1891, a quadriga (a four-horse chariot) entitled ‘Triumph’ was sculptured by Adrian Jones, and in 1912 it was erected on top of the arch we see today.

Right next to the Wellington Arch stands the Apsley Gate which is the entrance to Hyde Park. Made from Portland stone, this too was designed by Decimus Burton, and built between 1826 and 1829.

img_4952
The Apsley Gate

Through the Apsley Gate takes me to Hyde Park! With 350 acres of green space and stunning landscapes, it’s one of London’s eight Royal Parks.

img_4957
Hyde Park

Back in 1536, Henry VII acquired Hyde Park from the monks of Westminster Abbey and would normally use it as a private hunting ground. However, when James I came to the throne, he limited access to it. It wasn’t until 1637 when Charles I made it open to the public that everyone could enjoy its beauty. In 1665, many London citizens camped out in the park to escape the Great Plague.

IMG_4963.jpeg
Hyde Park

To mark many significant occasions, Hyde Park became a venue for national celebrations. Notable events included fireworks in 1814 to mark the end of the Napoleonic Wars, the Great Exhibition in 1851, and the Silver Jubilee in 1977 in honour of Queen Elizabeth II’s 25 years on the throne. Since 2007, Hyde Park has hosted the spectacular Winter Wonderland theme park, which includes fairground rides, food markets, shows, and is the perfect way to get into the Christmas spirit!

One of main aspects of Hyde Park that I love is the wonderful Serpentine Lake. This amazing sight was the idea of Queen Caroline, the wife of George II, and was created by damming the Westbourne Stream in 1730. It’s nearly 40 acres with many picturesque views and a cafe nearby where you can sit to see all its beauty. This splendid area was one of the first lakes to be created in England.

img_4959

img_4960

img_4961

It’s such a wonderful feeling just hearing the sound of the birds and the trickling of the water, so very peaceful. The walk along the lake takes you to the Serpentine Bridge which goes over the waters.

img_4966
The Serpentine Bridge

When the park was extensively redesigned in the 1820s, John Rennie built the bridge to connect the West Carriage Drive between Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens. When standing on the bridge the view is breathtaking, with Hyde Park on one side, and Kensington Gardens on the other, you feel you’re amongst something special.

IMG_4973.jpeg
View from the Serpentine Bridge overlooking Hyde Park
IMG_4970.jpeg
View from the Serpentine Bridge looking at Kensington Gardens

Next to the Serpentine Bridge sits the Serpentine Sackler Gallery which was established in 1970 to showcase contemporary art and architecture. In its 47 years this Grade II listed building has presented pioneering exhibitions of 2,263 internationally renowned artists and architects.

IMG_4976.jpeg
The Serpentine Sackler Gallery

From art to another arch! The route from the Serpentine Bridge and Italian Gardens takes you to Henry Moore’s ‘The Arch’. This six-metre high sculpture is made from seven travertine stones which were sourced in Northern Italy. Weighing 37 tonnes it’s positioned on the north bank of the Long Water and was presented by Moore in 1980, two years after his 80th birthday celebrations were held in the Serpentine Gallery.

arrr
Henry Moore Arch

In 1996 it was dismantled after it was deemed to be structurally unstable. After an 18 month review and discussions between The Royal Parks and The Henry Moore Foundation it was rebuilt and placed in Kensington Gardens during July 2012. It’s great to see it back as it provides a unique view through it of Kensington Gardens, and if you ever want to see rabbits, there are loads near it!

It’s now time to move onto my final stop on today’s walk, Italian Gardens! This Grade II listed water garden is over 150 years old, and is located to the north of Kensington Gardens, near Lancaster Gate. The garden features four main basins and five urns which have designs of a Swan’s breast, woman’s head, ram’s head, dolphin, and oval. Also there is a white marble Tazza Fountain.

IMG_4994.jpeg
Italian Gardens

The gardens were designed by James Pennethorne, and built in 1860. The inspiration for them came from a similar layout in Osborne House on The Isle of Wight where Prince Regent and the royal family would spend their holidays.

IMG_4982.jpeg

To ensure Italian Gardens kept its wonderful beauty, two notable recent renovations have been undertaken on it, in 1991 and 2011 respectively. In 1991 the vases were re-carved, whilst in 2011 repairs were done including clearing silt from the fountain basins and removing the algae from the Portland stone and marble. The Tazza fountain which overlooks the Long Water also underwent work.

IMG_4989.jpeg
The Tazza Fountain

When you sit within these gardens it’s one of the most tranquil places you’ll ever visit, like being in a bubble, not aware of your surroundings. This is a true hidden gem of London, and somewhere you can just stay for ages watching the water flowing from the fountains. You do get a lump in your throat at its beauty.

Now eagle-eyed viewers will notice that the majority of my walks are done when the weather is pretty amazing! There’s two reasons for this. Firstly, recently this winter we’ve had loads of sunny days in London (of course it still does rain…!). And secondly, for me the best way to showcase London’s wonderful sights is to do it when you get clear skies, but rainy day walks can also be good!

But enough talking,  I think I’ll stop describing the gardens… as the photos below need no captions, or descriptions 🙂

IMG_4983.jpeg

IMG_4986.jpeg

IMG_4988.jpeg

IMG_4995.jpeg

img_4987

Well, what a stunning way to end today’s walk! It’s been a stroll where we’ve seen some of London’s great arches and green spaces, and I hope you enjoyed reading it as much as I did walking it! Thanks for joining me, and don’t forget to follow me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and to sign up to my blog too 🙂

See you next week for another walk!

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger, unless photo credit given © Copyright 2017

History of the Wellington Arch – English Heritage 

History of the Apsley Gate – The Royal Parks

History of Hyde Park – The Royal Parks

Information about the the Serpentine Sackler Gallery – Serpentine Galleries

About The Arch by Henry Moore – The Royal Parks 

History of Italian Gardens – The Royal Parks

Mile End Park to London Fields: Exploring Parks of the 19th & 21st Century

Hello there! Thanks for joining me for another walking adventure across the city of London! This week I’m going to be exploring East London, where my journey begins at Mile End Park. From there I’ll take the beautiful Regent’s Canal walk to the amazing Victoria Park, before finishing in the very peaceful London Fields.

map2.PNG
Mile End Park to London Fields

Based in East London, Mile End Park is a relatively new addition to London having been opened in 2004 as part of the Millennium Commission, who called for suitable projects to be created as a way to mark the millennium.

IMG_0745.jpeg

However, plans for a park in Mile End date back to 1943 when Sir Patrick Abercrombie mooted them in his 1944 ‘Greater London Plan’. The site has had development done to it before the park we see today, including trees being planted, a playing field opened in 1952 as well as the East London Stadium being built and opened in 1966.

In 1985 the land became the responsibility of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. By 1995 the Tower Hamlets Environment Trust, the East London Partnership, and the London Borough of Tower successful got Millennium funding worth £12.33m.

The aim of the new park was to make it a sustainable area which was built and would benefit the local community and act as a catalyst for regional regeneration. The area includes many green spaces, a playground, Ecology Park, Art Pavilion, cafe, and outdoor gallery space. I only discovered this gem a few years back when I was walking a long The Regent’s Canal, and it’s totally worth the visit!

And speaking of The Regent’s Canal, it’s time to join it, as we make our way along our journey. The Regent’s Canal was opened in 1801 to connect the Grand Junction Canal’s Paddington Arm with the Thames at Limehouse. For more information on the history of The Regent’s Canal, check out my previous walk, King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath!

My pleasant walk along the Regent’s Canal takes me under numerous bridges, and its beauty demonstrates why this is my favourite stretch of walking!

IMG_0766.jpeg

A short walk past Mile End lock which is upstream.

IMG_0769.jpeg
Mile End Lock

My route takes me to one of the aforementioned developments within the Mile End project, The Art Pavilion.

This pavilion provides a stunning gallery space with grass and the small lake overlooking the area. It’s a popular place for exhibitions and installations, and there aren’t many places in London which have this cute feel and unique view.

From culture to a canal, as I rejoin the Regent’s Canal once again passing through the tranquil riverside.

This takes me to the Old Fort Lock where the Regent’s Canal meets the Hertford Union Canal.

IMG_0785.jpeg
Old Fort Lock

I’ll now take a detour off the Regent’s Canal to make my way to the truly wonderful Victoria Park.

img_0789
Lakeside view at Victoria Park

Opened in 1845, Victoria Park is located in the East of London bordering Bethnal Green, South Hackney, and Cambridge Heath. The park has 86.18 hectares of open space with a riverside cafe and many marvellous lakes.

IMG_0803.jpeg
Bridge to enter one of the Park’s islands

Back in 1839, the Annual Report of the Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages noted that the East End of London had a higher mortality rate than the rest of the city due to overcrowding, insanitary conditions, and polluted air. One way to reduce the amount of deaths and extend people’s lives was to create a park. Over 30,000 residents signed a petition, and in 1841 London’s first public park to be built specifically for people had begun! Hence, Victoria Park is also known as the ‘People’s Park’.

The Government bought land that had formally been used for market gardens, grazing, and gravel digging. The man behind the design for Victoria Park was James Pennethorne who was an architect to the Commissioners of Woods and Forests.

A boating lake with three islands was also created with The Chinese Pagoda sitting within one of these. It was originally the entrance at Hyde Park Corner to the Chinese Exhibition between 1842 and 1843, however, this summerhouse later moved to its current position in Victoria Park.

img_0814
The Chinese Pagoda

A walk along the vast area of Victoria Park takes you to many open green spaces, and a nice little seating area!

IMG_0825.jpeg
Nothing like a peaceful park!
IMG_0822.jpeg
Lovely seating area in the park

One of the distinct monuments within the park is that of the Burdett-Coutts Memorial Drinking-Fountain which was designed by H.A. Darbishire and has been in the park since 1862.

img_0832
The Burdett-Coutts Memorial Drinking Fountain

The fountain made from pink marble, granite, and stone, has a distinctive cupola, ornamental slate roof, four clock-faces, Gothic arches, and inscriptions.

IMG_0835.jpeg

It was gift by wealthy philanthropist Angela Burdett-Coutts to the people who visited Victoria Park and gave residents clean drinking water too.

In 1872 the park was extended on land that was originally going to be used for residential developments. A well-loved and valuable institution to the people in London, especially those in the East, the park has Grade II listed status. In 2011 the park had major restorations and improvements done to it with £12m being spent by Tower Hamlets Council, and I think it’s well worth it!

The park today hosts numerous events including the Lovebox Music Festival, and is a popular attraction for many who live in the East End.

After taking in the splendour of Victoria Park I’m now going to rejoin the Regent’s Canal as I make my way to the final destination, London Fields.

IMG_0844.jpeg
On the edge of Victoria Park sits the Regent’s Canal

As you walk along the Regent’s Canal you come across these distinctive gasometers near Bethnal Green which have been there since the 1850s. There aren’t many of these around in London these days, so it’s great to see these iconic ones still going strong along the river.

IMG_0846.jpeg
Gasometers near Bethnal Green

The walk up the streets takes me to London Fields, a 31-acre park located in south-central Hackney. It was first recorded by its name London Field in 1540, though there has been pasture land adjoining nearby Cambridge Heath since 1275.

IMG_0849.jpeg
London Fields

The land was used by drovers to pasture their livestock before taking them to market in London. By the late 19th century, its name was pluralised to ‘London Fields’.

Council flats began to be built in the surrounding area to replace the slums in the early 1930s. Today, the park has a playground, cricket pitch, a lido, and a tennis court, and if you want a nice, quiet area to enjoy your lunch, it’s perfect!

My journey has taken me from two parks, one opened in the 21st century and the other in the 19th century, taking in one of London’s most popular walks along the Regent’s Canal. I hope you’ve enjoyed taking in some of the capital’s great green spaces! Don’t forget to follow me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and to sign up to my blog too 🙂

Stay tuned for another walk through London next week! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger unless credit given. © Copyright 2017

About Mile End Park – London Gardens Online

About The Art Pavilion and images of the inside – Tower Hamlets Gov

The Old Fort Lock – Canal and River Trust

History of Victoria Park – Tower Hamlets Gov

Information about the Chinese Pogoda – London Gardens Trust

History of Burdett-Coutts Memorial Drinking-Fountain – The Victorian Web

Bethnal Green Gasworks – The Guardian 

History of London Fields – British History Online

History of London Fields – Hidden London

St Paul’s Cathedral to Moorgate: The Influence of The Great Fire of London

A warm welcome to a new week, and a new walk! This instalment takes me from the iconic St Paul’s Cathedral past the financial district of Bank before finishing in Finsbury Circus in Moorgate. So grab your boots, and let’s get walking!

Capture1.png
St Paul’s Cathedral to Moorgate

My journey begins at St Paul’s Cathedral which has had a dedication to Paul the Apostle (St Paul) on its site since AD 604.

img_0616
The grand St Paul’s Cathedral

The cathedral we see today is at least the fourth to have stood on this site. It was created by one of Britain’s most famous architects, Sir Christopher Wren between 1675 and 1710, with its predecessor having been destroyed in The Great Fire of London in 1666.

IMG_0654.jpeg

The cathedral stands at 365 feet (111m) high which made it the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1967… which is remarkably small when you consider The Shard is the tallest building now at 1,016 feet (309.6m)! After Liverpool Cathedral, St Paul’s is the second largest church building in the UK, and has one of the most distinctive domes in the world.

img_0628

The area surrounding St Paul’s is steeped in history and sights too, with the Paternoster Square sitting opposite the cathedral. It can trace its origins back to medieval Paternoster Row, where St Paul’s clergy would hold rosary beads and recite the ‘Paternoster’, or Lord’s Prayer (Paternoster translates as ‘Our Father’) whilst walking through the area.

img_0640
Temple Bar with St Paul’s in the background

The square is 70,000m² of office space, retail outlets and cafés. Standing at the entrance of the square is the Temple Bar arch, which was constructed by Sir Christopher Wren between 1669 and 1672. Its name derives from the gateway’s original position near the Temple Law courts, and displays its four original states  (Charles I, Charles II, James I and Queen Anne of Denmark), and was carved by John Bushnell.

It was one of the eight original City gateways – the others being Aldgate, Aldersgate, Bishopsgate, Cripplegate, Ludgate, Moorgate and Newgate.

img_0639

The Temple Bar Gate is actually the only one of these gates that has survived, with the others being demolished by the end of the 18th century. However, by 1878 it had become too expensive to maintain and caused traffic congestion. This lead to it being dismantled. Though in 1880, Sir Henry Meux bought all the stones and rebuilt it as a gateway to his park and mansion at Theobalds Park (located between Enfield and Cheshunt).

In 1984 the gates were purchased by the Temple Bar Trust from the Meux Trust, and in 2004 it was returned from Theobalds Park and re-erected at the entrance to Paternoster Square.

Another notable landmark in the Square is the Paternoster Column, which stands at 23.3m tall, and was erected in 2008.

img_0636
Paternoster Column

Comprised of a hexagonal stone base, a fluted Corinthian column and a glided copper urn, it was designed to be the ‘centre of gravity’ for the entire Paternoster development. The structure is a recreation of those designed for the west portico of the old St Paul’s. Also the London Stock Exchange is located within the square, which was founded in 1801.

From Paternoster Square and St Paul’s I take a short walk to a rather pleasant area known as Festival Gardens.

IMG_0658.jpeg
Festival Gardens next to St Paul’s

First laid in 1951 by Sir Albert Richardson for the Corporation of London’s contribution to the Festival of Britain, it’s based over once bomb damaged land from the Second World War.

The gardens include a wall fountain, which was a gift from the Worshipful Company of Gardeners. Erected in 1973, the sculpture in the garden is that of ‘The Young Lovers’ by George Ehrlich.  The gardens provide a perfect view of St Paul’s and across the rest of the surrounding area!

From the tranquil gardens and splendour of St Paul’s, my walk takes me onto my next destination, Bank! Within the vicinity of the Bank area, there are three famous monuments, Mansion House, the Royal Exchange, and the Bank of England.

The Mansion House was completed in 1758 as a residence for Lord Mayors to undertake their work as heads of the City’s governmental, judicial and civic duties. Before the Mansion House was constructed they used to have to do these functions in their own houses or halls, a true Working from Home initiative!

img_0697
The Mansion House

Designed by George Dance the Elder, this Grade I listed building is in the heart of the City, right next to Bank tube station. Today, the house has a collection of plates and art including sculptures and 84 Dutch paintings of the Harold Samuel Art Collection.

Just a slight stroll from the Mansion House takes me to another synonymous financial part of Bank, The Royal Exchange. The origins of The Royal Exchange date back to 1566 when a wealthy merchant by the name of Sir Thomas Gresham established London’s first purpose-built centre for trading stocks. Its design was based on the world’s oldest financial exchange, the Bourse in Antwerp, Belgium.

img_0673
The Royal Exchange, with the Cheesegrater and The Gherkin behind it

It was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth I in 1571, and one thing to note is that if you ever wanted a drink there, you could, as it was awarded a license to sell alcohol! Two additional floors were added to the original trading floor in 1660 to house retail businesses. However, in 1666, The Great Fire of London destroyed it, and it took three years for it to be reopened. The 1669 site was designed by City surveyor Edward Jerman.

img_0684

Amazingly, and by a shocking coincidence, the new Royal Exchange was destroyed by a fire too in 1838, which was most likely caused by an overheated stove in Lloyd’s Coffee House on nearby Lombard Street… talk about bad luck! It was certainly third time lucky in 1844 when the current Royal Exchange was built and designed by Sir William Tite.

Traders moved out of the building after the Second World War which left it disused for several decades. The London International Financial Futures Exchange moved into the building in 1982 which meant trading returned there. By 2001 architect Aukett Fitzroy Robinson remodeled it and turned it into a luxury shopping and dining destination. Today, The Royal Exchange is one of London’s leading landmarks, which has kept its retail theme with boutique shops and dining offerings.

To the side of The Royal Exchange sits The Bank of England which was founded in 1694, and was initially to act as the Government’s banker and debt manager. It’s the central bank of the UK, with its Monetary Policy Committee responsible for setting the economy’s Base Rate and Interest Rates.

img_0698
The Bank of England

Back in 1688 there were calls for a national or public bank to mobilise the nation’s resources, given that businesses were flourishing, though money and credit systems were weak.

Scottish entrepreneur William Paterson invited the public to invest in a new project, and in just a few weeks, £1.2 million was invested to form the initial capital stock of the Bank of England. This was lent to the Government in return for a Royal Charter, which was sealed on the 27th July 1694, and the Bank became the Government’s banker and debt manager.

bank
The Back of the Bank

During the 1920s and 1930s, the Bank was redesigned by Sir Herbert Baker, whilst surviving several bombs during the Blitz. In 1946 it was nationalised and subsequently came under the ownership of the Government, rather than private stockholders. Full responsibility for monetary policy was transferred to The Bank of England in 1997. Today, as well as being the UK’s central bank to maintain monetary and financial stability, a free museum of its history is inside too.

After taking in all that financial jargon, it’s time to get some peaceful rest! And my final location of today’s walk can provide just that, as I head to Finsbury Circus in Moorgate.

img_0723
Finsbury Circus

The gardens were created in 1815 by William Montague and George Dance the Younger on the site that was originally part of Finsbury Manor. A campaign led by Alpheus Morton to make the park public succeeded in the early 20th century, having been a private space for the surrounding buildings.

img_0724
Finsbury Circus

The bandstand in the gardens has been there since 1955, though currently the area behind it is being used as a major construction site for Crossrail.

IMG_0728.jpeg
Finsbury Circus Bandstand

I’ve seen how The Great Fire of London played its part in the reconstruction of some of the capital’s most iconic buildings, and how London’s banking district plays its part in both the City’s and the UK’s history.

Thanks for joining me, and I hope you’ve enjoyed the walk! Stay tuned for another walk next week 🙂 In the meantime, you can follow me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2017

History of St Paul’s Cathedral – St Paul’s Cathedral

About Paternoster Square – Paternoster Square 

Gardens of St Paul’s – City of London

History of Mansion House – City of London

History of The Royal Exchange – The Royal Exchange

History of The Bank of England – The Bank of England

History of Finsbury Circus – Historic England