Ravenscourt Park to Wormwood Scrubs: Colourful Autumnal London

Welcome one and all as I take another stroll across the capital! For my walk today I’ll be embracing the colours of Autumn as I explore Hammersmith & Fulham and Acton to really get into the spirit of the changing of the season. I’ll begin in Ravenscourt Park, go past Acton Green Common and Acton Park before ending my journey at Wormwood Scrubs. So grab the coat, scarf and walking boots!

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Ravenscourt Park to Wormwood Scrubs Park

I start my walk in Ravenscourt Park which is an 8.3 hectare (20.5 acre) public green area in the borough of Hammersmith & Fulham. Its origins date back to the medieval manor and estate of Palingswick (or Paddenswick) Manor which was first recorded on the site in the 12th century.  The name still has significance to the area today with a Paddenswick Road near Ravenscourt Park.

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Ravenscourt Park
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Ravenscourt Park

Back in the 13th century the Manor House within Ravenscourt Park had a moat surrounded by it which today forms part of the lake that is within the park. Whilst in the 14th century the Manor was occupied by King Edward III’s mistress Alice Perrers.

In 1650 the Manor House was rebuilt and in 1747 renamed Ravenscourt after it was sold to Thomas Corbett with the name Ravenscourt probably deriving from the raven on his coat of arms.

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The Ravenscourt House (Source: Friends of Ravenscourt Park)
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The view across the old moat today

Private owner George Scott who was a builder and philanthropist bought the Ravenscourt House in 1812 and a leading landscaper by the name of Humphry Repton helped to lay down the gardens in the estate. Park plans in 1830 indicated that there were 78 houses within the park which had risen to 330 by 1845. The Ravenscourt House was also the first public library in Hammersmith in 1889.

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Ravenscourt Park

George Scott’s family sold the estate to a developer in 1887 with it being acquired by the Metropolitan Board of Works. A year later in 1888 a public park was laid out by J.J. Sexby with the management of the park transferring to the London County Council in 1889. In 1941 the building suffered severe damage during the Second World War. However, in 1965 the park was owned by the Greater London Council and finally the London Borough of Hammersmith in 1971.

The park’s café today is the old stables of the manor and is certainly one of the grandest café’s in London! The park also has a variety of facilities including football pitches, tennis & basketball courts and a playground.

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The old Manor stable is now the park’s cafe

Walking through the park you really get a sense that the season is changing with an array of beautiful colours, all of which look like a watercolour painting and many different shades of yellow, brown, red, orange and gold. When you look at the vast area of the park as well as the lake which used to be the Manor’s moat, you can get a feeling of how the grand estate would’ve looked. The lake is something to behold and matched with the trees colours, it makes for the perfect picture, or painting!

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Ravenscourt Park
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Ravenscourt Park
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Ravenscourt Park
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Ravenscourt Park
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Ravenscourt Park
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Ravenscourt Park

It’s now time to leave the tranquility of Ravenscourt Park to go in search of more pretty autumnal colours in my next stop Acton Green Common. Located next to Turnham Green tube station, the 5.9 hectare (14.5 acres) common is quite unique given that it’s split into two, with a road and crossing in between it.

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Acton Green Common
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Acton Green Common

The Acton Green Common has a place in history as part of the site of the Battle of Brentford during the Civil War when on the 12th November 1642 the Royalists under Prince Rupert surprised them and beat the Parliamentarian army under Lord Essex.

I do love the symmetry where you have trees either side of the pathway and as far as you can see there are trees across the green. Once again the crisp orange colouring comes out perfectly with the sun shining on them which really does brighten up the park. Also the lengthening shadows illustrates the sun is getting lower and winter is on its way.

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Acton Green Common
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Acton Green Common

I’m now going to make my way out of Acton Green Common and onto yet another lovely green space, Acton Park. One aspect you get when walking around Acton is that the trees aren’t just confined to the parks as they can be seen across the roads and houses!

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Acton Symmetry

Acton Park first opened to the public in 1888 as a commemoration to the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria and in 1945 the park’s allotments were converted into temporary houses for ex-servicemen.

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Acton Park
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Acton Park

In London we’re so lucky that nearly every area has some kind of green space where you can relax in the peace and quiet of a park setting. Also it’s not just the grass areas which I love, but the variety of trees are also so remarkable, big ones, tall ones, small ones, thin ones, the list is endless and all have their own distinct look and personality. You really don’t get this when you walk around some areas of central London, so you do have to go off track into the London boroughs to see all of natures glory.

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Acton Park
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Acton Park

It’s now time to leave Acton Park and move onto my final autumnal destination, the quite unique Wormwood Scrubs! Based in the North-Eastern corner of Hammersmith & Fulham, the area is the largest open space in the borough at 80 hectares (200 acres) and is one of the largest commons in London.

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Wormwood Scrubs
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Wormwood Scrubs

The park has been open to the public since 1879 and was even the home of Queens Park Rangers Football Club in the late 1888s.

Its history dates back to the early 19th century when the entire district of Hammersmith & Fulham was open fields with several areas of common land. In 1812 a 77 hectare (190 acre) area known as Wormholt Scrubs was leased by the War Office from the Manor of Fulham. The area was used to exercise cavalry horses which until then had used Hyde Park, Belgrave Square and Regent’s Park. In 1878, 55 hectares (135 acres) of the land became known as Wormwood Scrubs after being bought by the War Office.

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Wormwood Scrubs

In order to create metropolitan exercising ground for the military, in 1879 Parliament passed the Wormwood Scrubs Act. This act enabled the military to expel civilians from the area whenever they were training, but allowed civilians free use of it when they were not. The military were banned from building any permanent structures other than rifle butts on the open land.

The area gained the reputation of being one of the duelling grounds of London with several duels being fought there. The scrubland played a part in the 1908 Olympics with the marathon’s final stages going through it on the route from Windsor Castle to the Olympic Stadium in White City.

In 1910 Wormwood Scrubs gained a significant contribution in aviation history when pioneering airships took flight from an improvised landing ground. Four years later in 1914 all air related activities on the scrubs passed to the authority of the Admiralty with the area remaining an emergency landing ground until the 1930s. During the Second Wold War, the scrubs hosted the military department called The Chief Cable Censorship Department, an outstation of the Government Code and Cypher School at Bletchley Park.

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Wormwood Scrubs

Back in 1986 local birdwatcher Lester Holloway set up a campaign to save Scrubs Wood which was under threat from plans by British Rail to turn it into a cleaning depot. The campaign would succeed with an area of the nature reserve known as ‘Lester’s Embankment’ in 1987.

There has been many conservation efforts undertaken on the area with the park home to over 100 species of birds, 250 species of wildflowers, bats and lizards.

The entire area really is something to behold, as it’s a vast area of meadowland with hardly anything around it, there aren’t too many trees or houses, just scrubland and long grass. I have to say it’s one of the first times my walks have taken me to such a place and it’s eerily quiet when you’re stood in the middle of it as there’s literally no one walking through or by it. This is one of the reason why I love exploring London as you come across such weird and wonderful places like this which you’d not normally come across, or even know about.

Well that’s all from me today folks! I hope you enjoyed discovering some of West London’s best green areas which showcased the colours of autumn so amazingly well, which I’m sure you can agree are looking absolutely golden at the moment! I’ll be discovering more of beautful autumnal London next time!

In the meantime you can catch me on Twitter and Instagram and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too and have a read of my other walks, from river ones to park ones, there’s something there for you! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger unless stated. © Copyright 2018

Friends of Ravenscourt Park: History of Ravenscourt Park

Parks and Gardens: History of Acton Green Common

Ealing.Gov: History of Acton Parks

London Borough of H&F: History of Wormwood Scrubs

 

Highgate to Finsbury Park: Exploring Hidden Highgate Gems

Hello there! Thanks for joining me on my next outdoor adventure as I explore the best walks of the capital. Today’s stroll begins in Highgate’s Waterlow Park, takes me past the Highgate Cemetery and onto the woodland wonders of Highgate Wood. I’ll take a detour up to the renowned Alexandra Palace and finish the walk at Finsbury Park. So let’s get going!

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Highgate to Finsbury Park

I do love it when my walks start with a picturesque entrance and Waterlow Park in Highgate provides just this, with a very welcoming park gate which says to me ‘Come on in’.

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Enter Please!

The park’s history dates back to the 16th century where the area was known for its affluent residents, many of whom built homes and fine gardens, some of which are now within Waterlow Park. One of the attractions to the residents was that the air was cleaner than other parts of London.

A walk through the park illustrates just how peaceful it is and that with every turn there’s something of glorious green to see!

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Waterlow Park
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Waterlow Park
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Waterlow Park
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Waterlow Park

You’ll never struggle to find a spot to sit, or to grab a photo of the park.

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Waterlow Park

Another one of the attractions of people moving to Highgate in the 16th Century was the plentiful water supply from the park’s three historic ponds which are still fed by natural springs.  I always think a park isn’t complete without a pond or a lake, there’s something very satisfying about hearing the trickling of water in a tranquil park setting.

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Waterlow Park
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Waterlow Park Pond

At the head of the park and sitting grandly on the top of the hill is Lauderdale House which was the home of the Earl of Lauderdale in the 17th Century. The house today is a delightful cafe where you can stop for a spot of tea or light lunch, with a view overlooking the glorious grounds of the park. The garden area of the house is commonly noted as one of the very early examples of terraced gardens in Britain. It really doesn’t feel like a park, more that you’ve wandered into someone’s estate and garden!

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Lauderdale House
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View looking out from Lauderdale House

During the 17th Century there was a home within the park for the poet Andrew Marvell where a bronze plaque within the park dedicated to him stands. Another resident in the park was prolific architect and park designer Sir James Pennethorne who unsurprisingly helped with designing some of the elements of the park.

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Waterlow Park

From 1856 English philanthropist and Liberal Party politician Sydney Waterlow lived within the park and soon acquired the neighboring properties to create his own mini-estate, with Lauderdale House being let out as Convalescent homes for medical professionals.

However, Sydney Waterlow didn’t stay long at the estate and it remained empty and deteriorated for a number years until he presented it to the London County Council in 1889 and it was termed as ‘a garden for the gardenless’. So if you didn’t have a garden, you could enjoy it as your very own one. The council named it after Sydney and ensured that all the historic features within it remained.

It’s time to leave Waterlow Park and as a you head out you take a stroll past Highgate Cemetery. Established in 1839, the cemetery is split into the West and East Cemeteries with approximately 170,000 people buried in and around the 53,000 graves.

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Highgate Cemetery

Spanning 15 hectares (37 acres) in size, the cemetery was acquired by The Friends of Highgate Cemetery Trust in 1975 with them acquiring the freehold to both the East and West Cemeteries by 1981.

Some of the notable people within the East Cemetery include the tomb of Karl Marx, the ashes of the author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Douglas AdamsWilliam Foyle (co-founder of book store Foyles), Sir Thomas Lauder Brunton, 1st Baronet (Scottish physician known for his work in the treatment of angina pectoris), Patrick Caulfield (painter and printmaker known for his pop art canvasses) and Roger Lloyd-Pack (British actor).

Within the West Cemetery notable people buried there include Julius Beer (Owner of the UK newspaper The Observer), James Bunstone Bunning (City Architect to the City of London), Charles Cruft (founder of Crufts dog show), the parents, wife and brother of Charles DickensLucian Freud (painter, grandson of Sigmund Freud, and elder brother of Clement Freud),  Bob Hoskins (actor), George Michael (singer), and Jean Simmons (actress).

Additionally, there are the graves of 318 Commonwealth service personnel with 259 from the First World War and 59 from the Second.

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Highgate Cemetery

It’s now time to move on to my next stop on today’s walk, Highgate Wood! To do so I get to walk through Highgate and experience what a pleasant area it is, with it having a real village feel about it. With cute little houses, village greens and not a great deal of traffic, you forget you’re still in London!

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Highgate Village
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Highgate Village
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Highgate Houses

Now this is one true hidden gem of London that I’m about to explore! Lying between East Finchley, Highgate Village and Muswell Hill, Highgate Wood is a 28 hectare (70 acre) ancient woodland.

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Highgate Wood Entrance

Highgate Wood appears within the Ordnance Survey map of Middlesex in 1886 which illustrates the area’s illustrious history. Predominately an oak, hornbeam and holly wood, there are more than 50 tree and shrub species within the woodlands. The wood is also home to the rare deciduous tree with brown berries, known as The Wild Service Tree or the Sorbus torminalis.

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Highgate Wood
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Highgate Wood
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Highgate Wood

The woods aren’t just home to trees and plants, but 71 different species of bird have been recorded there, as well as foxes, grey squirrels, seven species of bats, 180 species of moth, 12 species of butterfly and 80 species of spider!

There have also been prehistoric flints found within the wood with excavations from Romano-Britons found which indicated that pottery materials were produced from local materials between AD 50-100.

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Highgate Wood
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Highgate Wood

The wood hasn’t always been well maintained or looked after with The City of London Corporation’s not being sympathetic to the historical origins. After they acquired it asphalt paths were laid, ornamental trees planted and dead wood removed and burned, with it being managed as more of an urban park than an ancient woodland.

In 1968 the Conversation Committee of the London Natural History Society became concerned after the planting of exotic conifers which were seen as inappropriate for an ancient woodland. Consequently, this type of planting programme was halted and hasn’t been used since.

Since then the management of the woodland has been more considered with little human interference. It’s listed as one of only eight Green Heritage Sites in London and is a Site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conversation. The woodland is currently a registered charity managed and funded by the City of London.

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Highgate Wood
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Highgate Wood

Walking through the woodland it does remind me of the Children’s rhyme a ‘Teddy Bear’s Picnic’ as it has that fairytale and adventurous feel you’d find in a storybook. With loads of campfires and logs for sitting on across the park, it really is a wonderful place for children to explore and to be introduced to the wonders of nature. It’s very easy to get lost within all the amazing trees and when you look up & across all you see is leaves and branches, something you don’t get to enjoy that much everyday. For as far as you can see, there’s nothing but the glorious woods and every time you take a stroll around it there’s something new and enlightening.

Having already discovered the breathtaking Russia Dock Woodland, Highgate Wood is certainly up there with it!

The wood isn’t just trees and plants, but a walk to the end of it takes you to a large open green field used for football and cricket.

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Highgate Wood Playing Fields

As much as I’d love to spend all day in the woodland, I’m now going to head off to a place which gives you a truly wonderful view of London, Alexandra Palace.

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Alexandra Palace

Known as ‘Ally Pally’, the palace was designed by Owen Jones, John Johnson and Alfred Meeson, and first opened in 1873 on Queen Victoria’s 54th birthday. The spectacular celebration for the opening included concerts, recitals and fireworks. However, just 16 days later a fire broke out in the Palace destroying the structure.

It wasn’t until two years later in 1875 that the new Alexandra Palace was opened to the public with it containing the new Henry Wills organ, one of the largest in Europe at the time.  The palace also has the honour of having marksmen from the Alexandra Palace Rifle Society representing Great Britain in the 1908 Olympics where they won Gold, Silver and Bronze medals.

During the First World War the palace was used as a Belgian refugee camp and later as a German and Austrian internment camp.

One of the most significant events occurred on the 2nd November 1936 when the world’s first regular high-definition public television broadcast took place from the BBC studios at Alexandra Palace. A blue plaque is present to commemorate this and the TV mast is still there today. 1936 also saw the park become free for the public to use as a result of the 1900 Alexandra Park and Palace Act.

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BBC TV Mast
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BBC TV Mast
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View of the BBC TV Mast

During the Second World War the palace was once again used by Belgian refugees with the transmitter tower being used as a decoy for enemy aircrafts.

The palace’s grounds were the home to horse racing until the racecourse was closed in 1970. In 1980, for the second time, a fire broke out across the palace burning a large part of the building. Substantial restoration began after the fire and it was reopened in 1988.

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Alexandra Palace

The palace was recognised in 1996 as a building of special architecture and historic significance with it receiving a Grade II listing. The venue has hosted a wide range of events including numerous concerts, Master Snooker, the World Darts Championship, Antiques Fairs, beer festivals, award ceremonies and a firework display every Bonfire Night.

One of the most prominent aspects of the palace and one that I thoroughly enjoyed is the stunning view you get of the capital from it. It’s such an awe-inspiring view across London of some of its most well-known landmarks, and great to experience them from another angle on my walks, having seen them on Hampstead Heath as well as Stave Hill! It always amazes me just how much you can from just one area of the capital and perfectly demonstrates that all of London’s landmarks are in such close proximity to one another!

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View looking out from Alexandra Palace
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View looking out from Alexandra Palace

Behind the palace is a pretty little lake and cafe, so it you require a bit of down-time and relaxation, it’s ideal for just that!

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Back of Alexandra Palace
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Lake behind Alexandra Palace
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Lake behind Alexandra Palace

I’m now going to begin a stroll to my final destination on this walk, Finsbury Park by heading down the hills on Alexandra Palace!

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Alexandra Palace Hill

Once I’ve left there I walk down Priory Road through the quaint Priory Park.

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Priory Park

The walk takes you along the road past the houses and Finsbury Park station until you get to the gates of the park.

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Entrance to Finsbury Park

Opened in 1869, the 46 hectares (110 acres) park was designed by Frederick Manable. Based in Harringay, it was one of the first of the great London parks laid out in the Victorian Era. The park was originally landscaped as a woodland area in the Manor of Brownswood and part of the woodland called Hornsey Wood which was cut back to be used as a grazing land in the Middle Ages.

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Finsbury Park

In the 18th Century a tea room was opened where Londoners could enjoy the woodlands. These tea rooms were developed into larger buildings known as the Hornsey Wood House (Tavern). The area was also home to boating, shooting and archery, before the tavern was demolished in order to make the area into a park. Once the park opened, the pub across the park along the Seven Sisters Road called itself the Hornsey Wood Tavern after its original one! However, the tavern would close in 2007 with the area being developed.

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Finsbury Park

In the 19th century Londoners began to demand more open green space, something which had become even more common in Paris. To counteract the increasingly urbanisation of London, in 1841 the people of Finsbury petitioned for a park to be developed to help eradicate the poor conditions in the city. The first plans for the park were drawn up in 1850 with its name originally being called Albert Park. However, it was renamed Finsbury Park and opened in 1869.

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Finsbury Park

The park played a role in both the First and Second World Wars with it being the location for pacifist meetings in WWI, and used as military training grounds and hosting anti-aircraft guns in WWII.

Through the 1980s the park went into a decline and when its owner, the Greater London Council was wound up, Haringey Council took over the ownership of it. Luckily in 2003 the park was awarded £5 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund which helped with significant renovations to improve its facilities to enable the park we see today. The park is commonly known as the ‘People’s Park’ due to its strong community feel.

Well that’s all for this week’s walk of the capital which has seen us take a trip through Highgate’s park and woodlands, the spectacular architecture and views of Alexandra Palace, and the fabulous Finsbury Park.

Thanks for coming along on my walk and in the meantime you can catch me on Twitter and Instagram and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too and have a read of my other walks! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2018

Waterlow Park: History of Waterlow Park

Highgate Cemetery: History of Highgate Cemetery

Highgate Wood: History of Highgate Wood

Alexandra Palace: History of Alexandra Palace

Finsbury Park: History of Finsbury Park

Shoreditch to Islington Green: Trendy, Traditional and Tranquil East London

Greetings to you all and thanks for coming along with me on another journey across the capital! Today’s walk begins in Shoreditch with a visit to Boxpark and Brick Lane, before taking me to The Geffrye Museum of the Home. I’ll then go to Haggerston Park, with a pleasant walk along the Regent’s Canal to Shoreditch Park, with my final stop of Islington Green!

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Shoreditch to Islington Green

My walk begins in swanky Shoreditch and at one of its fairly recent sights, Boxpark, which was installed in 2011 as the world’s first pop-up mall. Created by Roger Wade, the whole concept of the area was to refit and repurpose shipping containers into an independent and revolutionary retail experience which showcases fashion and creativity in a street setting.

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Boxpark Front View

The distinctive model of the park is an alternative set-up not just for customers, but also retailers who are on the hunt for more affordable space in the capital. With an array of brands and places to dine, the park illustrates the unique reputation that Shoreditch brings. The success of Boxpark Shoreditch has seen two others ‘pop up’, one in Wembley and another in Croydon. It’s certainly quite different to walking around a huge mall, and with space in London becoming more sought after, you expect niche and quaint places such as these to be launching in many other areas.

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Boxpark Brands!

Now it’s time to leave Boxpark and do a bit of a wander around a few other sights in Shoreditch. Located in East London, Brick Lane was formerly known as Whitechapel Lane, though its name today derives from the brick and tile manufacturers who used the brick earth deposits in the 15th century.

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Bustling Brick Lane

Brewing began in Brick Lane around 1680, with one such brewer named Joseph Truman beginning his brewing there in 1683, and his family would go on to establish the sizeable Black Eagle Brewery on Brick Lane. The old building is still prominent in the Shoreditch skyline today, with it being used for food markets and events.

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Well-Known Truman Brewery

The Brick Lane market was first developed in the 17th century for the selling of fruit and vegetables. The area saw a wave of immigration throughout the 18th and 19th century with French Huguenots, the Irish and many people of the Jewish faith settling there.

The theme of immigration has continued into the 20th century with many Bangladeshi immigrants now residing in the area. It’s now the hub of London’s Bangladeshi community, which reenforced Brick Lane’s reputation of being famed for its many authentic curry restaurants. If you go there on a Sunday, which I did, the markets are thriving with a range of stalls selling a variety of clothes, handbags, jewellery and vintage, chic boutiques. 

The Brick Lane and Shoreditch area is seen by many to be quite edgy and hip, and whilst you walk around there past the many lovely independent coffee shops, there’s loads of street art which demonstrates the trendy reputation.

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Funky but Scary!
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All the Colours of the Rainbow!
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Not sure what this means?!

Shoreditch really is one of the most unique parts of London with it being a cultural hub of creativity and diversity through its art, food, people and places.

It’s time to leave Brick Lane, and head towards a peaceful little area called Arnold Circus, no clowns here though! The housing development within the Boundary Estate was opened in 1900 which makes it one of the earliest social housing schemes built by a local Government authority. The bandstand within the circus has the honour of having Grade II listed status.

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Arnold Circus Bandstand

Leaving the gardens, a walk towards Hoxton brings you to the very picturesque Geffrye Museum of the Home which was established in 1914 and aims to inspire everyone about the multiple meanings of the home from 1600 to the present day. To do this the museum showcases displays of urban living rooms, gardens, special exhibitions and events.

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The Geffrye Museum of the Home

Located on a former almshouse, a house built originally by a charitable person for poor people to live in, the building was developed in 1714 with the bequest of the former Lord Mayor of London and Master of the Ironmongers’ Company. The almshouse had fourteen houses with each having four rooms which provided retirement homes for up to 56 pensioners.

By the 18th century the area was mainly rural with market gardens to supply Londoners with fresh vegetables and herbs. During the 19th century with London expanding the area became home to the centre for London’s furniture and clothing trades, with the farmland being replaced with housing, factories and workshops.

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Glorious Grounds of the Museum

The Shoreditch area by 1910 had become one of London’s most heavily populated places and with serve overcrowding and little sanitation, the Ironmonger’s Company relocated and as a result sold the almshouses & gardens to the London County Council in 1912.

With the arts and crafts movement gaining momentum in the area, the location was converted into a museum in 1914 to inspire and educate people about the local furniture trade. With the furniture industry moving away from Shoreditch, the focus turned to collections around the home. As the years went on, the museum increased its collections of paintings, furniture and decorated arts, with a period garden being added in the 20th century.  The focus of the museum today centres on the home and home life reflected in changes in society, patterns of behaviour, style, fashion and taste.

The area does have a really grand and historical feel to it, and it’s quite hard to believe such a glorious area is hidden within bustling Shoreditch!

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Grand Gardens

It’s now time to carry on my walk to my next destination of Haggerston Park which is located in the south-west corner of Hackney.  Originally created in the 1950s, and extended in the 1980s, the park is carved out from the area of derelict housing, a tile manufacturer and the old Shoreditch gasworks. Occupying 6 hectares (15 acres) the scenic park includes many open green spaces as well as many football pitches. It really is the perfect place if you require a quiet spot for a picnic or just to relax, and the area is pretty vast for a park right within the Shoreditch area.

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Tranquil Haggerston Park
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Peaceful Paradise!
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The Park’s Football Pitches
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Picnic Perfect!

Taking a detour out of the park I’ll now head off to Shoreditch Park, however, to get there I’ll need to walk along one of my favourite stretches of water, the Regent’s Canal! My walks have frequently taken me along this stretch of water, as it goes through a vast majority of places and sights through the capital. To find out more about its history, check out my walk from King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath!

I recall the first time I walked along the Regent’s Canal back in 2014 having just stumbled across it when walking through Shoreditch, and since then it has always been one of my go-to walks and places to explore. It’s both a quiet and pretty place to stroll along with so much to see along it, whether that’s the boats, buildings, parks, locks or the lovely nature, it’s the place to be for a London walk. You can’t help but fall in love with it!

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One of my Favourite Places!
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Down by the Lovely River
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Beautiful Boats of the Canal

I’ll now take a detour off the canal, and head to Shoreditch Park which at 7.1 hectares (17 acres) is one of the borough’s largest parks serving the South of Hackney.  During the Regency Era and subsequent creation of the Regent’s Canal, the area was originally open fields and was developed into terraced housing for workers and families. However, during the Blitz and later air-raids in the early 1940s the area was badly damaged.

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Splendid Shoreditch Park

In 1945 the damaged homes from the bombs were cleared with temporary housing erected there as a stop-gap for the homeless families during the war. These were only designed to be there for a short-term basis, and nearly 20 years on they were removed in 1964, with the site being redeveloped and cleared between 1964 and 1973.

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Maybe the Only Park in London to Spell out its Name?!

The park we enjoy today has a number of facilities for sport, adventure & children’s playgrounds and an outdoor beach volleyball court. Every year the park is home to the Shoreditch Festival which offers live music, food and entertainment.

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Fun for all the Family!

I’ll now rejoin the Regent’s Canal and head onto my final stop on my walk, Islington Green!

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The Familiar Boats of the Regent’s Canal
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Autumnal Wonders

Based near Angel station, Islington Green is a small triangle of open land which marks the Northern boundary between the modern district of Angel and Islington. At the heart of the green is the Statue of Sir Hugh Myddleton (1560-1631) sculptured by John Thomas. Myddleton had a major role in constructing the original terminus for the New River, which was an artificial waterway in England opened in 1613 to supply London with fresh drinking water from the River Lea and Chadwell Springs and Amwell Springs. It’s so fitting that there is a statue for someone who did quite a remarkable job in helping provide such a significant aspect to people’s lives of clean drinking water!

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Statue of Hugh Myddelton

Well that’s all for today’s walk exploring the East and Inner sides of London, where you can discover everything from art, to museums, to parks, it really is a walk that would cater for everyone! Thanks for coming along on my walk and in the meantime you can catch me on Twitter and Instagram and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too and have a read of my other walks! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2018

Boxpark: History of Boxpark

Brick Lane: History of Brick Lane

Geffrye Museum: History of the Geffrye Museum

Haggerston Park: History of Haggerston Park

Shoreditch Park: History of Shoreditch Park

Islington Green: Information about Islington Green

Tower Bridge to Stave Hill: Discovering London’s Secret Treasures

Testing testing… is this blog still on?! Welcome one and all as I take another trip around our great capital to explore some of its best sights, sounds and secrets. My journey today begins at perhaps one of the most iconic landmarks in London, Tower Bridge, and will take me to a true hidden gem, Stave Hill, where my adventure ends. On the way I’ll pass through Southwark Park, Canada Water, Greenland Dock and Russia Dock Woodland, so grab those walking boots and let’s get going!

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Tower Bridge to Stave Hill

We start at a sight that isn’t just recognisable to Londoners, but people across the world, Tower Bridge. Opened on the 30th June 1894, it was designed by Horace Jones, the City’s Architect, in collaboration with John Wolfe Barry, and took eight years to construct using five major contractors and 432 workers a day.

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Tower Bridge

Originally chocolate brown in colour, the bridge was repainted in 1977 red, white and blue to celebrate the Queen’s Silver Jubilee, adding to the patriotic nature of the landmark. In order to construct it, a staggering 11,000 tons of steel were used to create the framework of the Tower and its walkways. Since 1976 the closing of the bridge has been operated with hydraulic power driven by oil and electricity rather than steam which was previously used. If you ever want to pass under the bridge, it’s free to do so and you can do it 365 days per year, though remember to give 24 hours’ notice! Every year the bridge is raised on average 850 times, so when you’re walking by it, you may well see it being lifted!

I do love the structure of Tower Bridge, it’s so distinctive and really illustrates the old, traditional historical significance to London, which only a few landmarks can bring. Also it has a real Royal feel to it and has to be the most beautiful bridge in the capital!

A short walk from Tower Bridge takes me to the Rotherhithe riverside where you get a ground-eye view of many of the capitals well-known landmarks. When you look across the river you can spot The Shard, Tower Bridge, The Walkie Talkie, The Cheese Grater, The Gherkin and even St Paul’s Cathedral, it’s like they’re all trying to squeeze into the photo!

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Rotherhithe Riverside

Walking along the river takes you to Southwark Park which opened to the public in 1869. Designed by Alexander McKenzie, the park is 25 hectares in size and includes a lake, bandstand, bowling green, play area, gallery, cafe and football pitches.

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Southwark Park Bandstand

Right beside the bandstand sits a drinking fountain which is commemorated to Mr Jabez West, who was a member of the local Temperance Society. This was London’s first public memorial to honour a working class man.

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Jabez West Drinking Fountain

A walk through the park takes you to the tranquil lakes and plants. The Ada Salter rose garden was built by West Bermondsey MP Alfred Salter in 1936 and was dedicated to Ada’s wife with the aim to provide somewhere of beauty where mothers and the elderly could sit.

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Ada Salter Rose Garden
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Fountain Within The Ada Salter Rose Garden

In 2001, £2.5m from the Heritage Lottery Funds was used for major refurbishment of the park. These included a replica of the 1833 bandstand from the Great Exhibition being replaced. Also a new bowling pavilion, children’s play area, restoring the lake and the main gates were created.

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Treemendous Views!

One of the main aspects of Southwark Park is that it combines nature with leisure and recreation, as on the one hand you have the picturesque lake, with the leisure of football pitches, something that parks like St James’s Park, Green Park and Hyde Park don’t have. It’s quite a vast area with a real community feel about it and has everything you could possible want from a park.

Leaving Southwark Park through its grand old gates, I take a short walk past Surrey Quays Overground station and Surrey Quays Shopping Centre to my next destination, Canada Water!

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Southwark Park Gates

As the name suggests, Canada Water’s origin comes from that of the country, Canada! Constructed in 1876 on the site of two former timber ponds, the name derives from the former Anglo-Canadian trade which took place in the docks. In 1926 two neighbouring timber ponds were replaced by the Quebec Dock, which were connected to the Canada Dock.

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Canada Water Shops

In 1964 the Canada Estate was built on the former site of the chemical works and consisted of five courts of 4 storey blocks. It wasn’t until the early 1980s when the docks finally shut down with the closure of the Surrey Docks, Quebec Dock and Canada Dock, with the majority of the old Canada Dock being filled in.

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Cute Water Walkway

The site that we see today has been redeveloped quite heavily with the Surrey Quays Shopping Centre now present with other entertainment places such as a cinema, bingo hall, bowling alley and restaurants. The regeneration project is a joint initiative by Southwark Council and British Land which was completed in 2012, and included new homes, commercial premises, a library and cultural spaces. The area is well connected too with Canada Water station being opened in 1999 with links to the London Overground and Jubilee Line.

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Canada Water Library in the Distance

Although Canada Water isn’t one of the most picturesque parts of London, I think it becomes much more appealing when you know the back story and origin of it, and that it used to be a major docking area. That makes it a bit more special to think that one day there was significant trade going on in the area, quite the contrast to the shops now there.

Having explored the history of one dock, it’s time to discover another as we head to Greenland Dock.

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Greenland Dock

The area has the honour of being the oldest of London’s riverside wet docks and used to be part of the Surrey Commercial Docks, most of which have now been filled in. Originally named Howland Great Wet Dock after the family that owned the land, the dock was excavated in 1696. It was renamed Greenland Docks by the mid-18th century when it became a base for arctic whaling, hence where the name Greenland comes into it!

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Overlooking Greenland Dock

During the 19th century it handled trade in Scandinavian and Baltic timber and Canadian gran, cheese and bacon, and was enlarged in 1904. The majority of the trading however was timber with the Surrey Commercial Docks controlling 80% of the capital’s timber trade.

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Greenland Dock

Technological changes in the shipping industry would soon push the docks into a spiral of decline and with timber being packaged as well as bulk carriers being far too large to accommodate the London docks, they were closed in 1970 with Greenland Dock being sold to Southwark Council. Between 1984 and 1990 the area saw vast change with 1,250 homes being built. Although trading has ceased in the docks, the waters are still used for boating and other water recreational uses.

Leaving Greenland Dock, it’s now time to move on to two of the most hidden gems and incredible wonders that London has to offer, as we first pay a visit to Russia Dock Woodland, then to Stave Hill.

The Russia Dock was one of the former Surrey Commercial Docks which also included the Island Dock and Surrey Basin. The docks were used to import timber from Norway, Sweden and Russia with it being mostly soft wood known as ‘deal wood’, which was used for newsprint and manufacturing furniture. Following the closure of the docks in the early 1970s the area was developed by the London Docklands Development Corporation (LDDC) and in 1980 was turned into a 34.5-acre (140,000m2) woodland. The woodland still contains some of the old features of the docks such as wall capstones, gauges, bollards, mooring chains and tracks. Now the area is maintained and owned by Southwark Council.

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Pretty Pathway
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Ditch within the Woodlands
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Loved this Old Wooden Bridge!

It’s hard to believe that this area is right in the heart of the capital, with Canary Wharf just a stone’s throw away! You definitely feel like you’re in a woodland far-far away from the hustle and bustle that London brings. Every corner of the woodland provides a treasure trove of secret pathways, ponds and plants, so you feel like you’ll discover something new every time. It does have the feeling you’re in a fairytale land as every part of it is magical.

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Woodland Wonders
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Pretty Pond
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Always Find Something New!
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Stepping into Paradise
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Funky Chairs
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Picnic Areas
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Pond Life

If ever there was a way to end a walk, our final stop is a fitting finale and the perfect piece de resistance. Right on the edge of Russia Dock Woodland sits Stave Hill which was added in 1985 by the LDDC, and is an artificial grass hill made up of waste material and rubble.

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Stairs Leading up Stave Hill

At the bottom of Stave Hill you’re greeted with a kind of stairway to heaven, and I have to say I didn’t just walk up them, I ran up them as I was so excited about the view I was about to experience.

Once you get to the top the view is awe-inspiring and you aren’t short of iconic landmarks to see across the skyline, how many can you spot?!

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Spot the Landmarks!
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Looking Across the Skyline

As you pan across the 360 degree viewing tower, you get a birds-eye view of Russia Dock Woodland which demonstrates how big it really is!

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View of Russia Dock Woodland

On the opposite side of the view down the stairs, sits a unique perspective of Canary Wharf with the trees sitting in front of it.

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View of Canary Wharf

On the hill sits a cast bronze map of the former docks, designed by Michael Rizzello. When you’re up there all you can hear is the birds tweeting and the sound of the winds breeze, adding to the peaceful feeling you’re immersed in.

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Michael Rizzello Map

Well what a truly special way to end the walk, I have to say the view from Stave Hill is up there with another of my favourites in Hampstead Heath. What makes Russia Dock Woodland and Stave Hill so different is that if you didn’t stumble across them, you’d probably never know they were there, I certainly didn’t! This is one of my more longer walks which takes a few hours to do, so give yourself plenty of time!

Thanks for joining me on my walk, I hope you enjoyed reading about it as much as I did walking it! In the meantime, you can catch me on Twitter and Instagram and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too and have a read of my other walks! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2018

Tower Bridge: History of Tower Bridge

Southwark.Gov: History of Southwark Park

Hidden London: History of Canada Water

Hidden London: History of Greenland Dock

Southwark.Gov: History of Russia Dock Woodland

The Conversation Volunteers: Info about Stave Hill

Hackney Downs to Springfield Park: Exploring the Lea Valley Walk

Thanks for joining me as I discover another part of the great city of London! Today’s walk explores the East side of the capital, uncovering some of the lovely parks that it has to offer as well as a beautiful walk along a stretch of the River Lea. My walk begins at Hackney Downs, takes me via Clapton and Millfields Park, before a riverside stroll, and ending at Springfield Park.

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Hackney Downs to Springfield Park

My journey starts at Hackney Downs which is a former Lammas land dating back to the 1860s. Before then in the 18th century horse racing took place there, with cricket, football and rugby clubs also using the land.

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Hackney Downs

In 1872 The Metropolitan Board of Works acquired the Downs from the Lord of the Manor, Mr Tyssen Amherst, and through an Act of Parliament, it became a public open space. This was prompted due to local residents in the 1860s trying to enclose and conserve all of the 180 acres of land.

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Hackney Downs

It wasn’t until 1884 that the Downs were opened as a public park with paths laid out in it and trees planted within it. In 1965 it became the responsibility of Hackney Council, who took over the helm of managing it from the London County Council.

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Hackney Downs

Throughout the years the area has seen various facilities added including women’s toilets in 1908 (hard to believe there were only men’s there…), the Hackney Downs Lodge in 1959, an extension to the bowling green in 1960, as well as a playground and sports courts. The park had major works undertaken on it in 2010 with new tennis courts, a multi-use games area, a play area and various sports pitches added to it.

It does have that real park feel about it which makes it very different to other parks such as Hyde Park and Green Park with the sporting element within it. A perfect place to enjoy a peaceful lunch, or a run, or to walk your dog!

A walk past Hackney Downs Overground Station takes me to this cute little pond. Clapton Pond has existed since the 1600s, and re-landscaped in the late 1800s for public use. The Pond has been awarded the Green Flag Award which is given to the best green spaces in the country.

It’s quite a distinct feature of the town of Clapton and the surrounding area as amongst the shops, roads and houses, you find this picturesque pond placed in the middle of them. The pretty bridge going over the water reminds me of Claude Monet’s painting, ‘The Water Lily Pond’. Quite a contrast in scenery, but you get where I’m coming from with its shape…!

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Clapton Pond
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Clapton Pond
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Clapton Pond
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Clapton Pond

Through the houses of Clapton I come across another one of East London’s green areas, Millfields Park.

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Millfields Park
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Millfields Park

At the end of the park I join the River Lea! The Lea Valley Walk is 50 miles (80km) long between Leagrave, the source of the river near Luton, to the Limehouse Basin near Canary Wharf.

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Map of the Lea Valley Walk: Photo Credit: Cicerone
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Joining the Lea Valley Walk
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Joining the Lea Valley Walk

The walk which was opened in 1993 can be split into four stages: Leagrave to Hatfield; Hatfield to Broxbourne; Broxbourne to  Lea Bridge Road (Walthamstow Marshes) and Lea Bridge Road (Walthamstow Marshes) to the Limehouse Basin. Within the 50 mile stretch, 18 of these are within London’s boundaries, and pass through areas including Walthamstow, Tottenham Hale and Bow. I joined it at stages 3/4, however, one day I’d love to do the entire stretch!

The Lea (or Lee) marked the boundary between pre-Roman tribal territories, and later formed the frontier between Alfred The Great’s land, and the Danelaw. Recently it has become the transition between Middlesex and Essex, and still forms the boundary between Essex and Hertfordshire to the north.

I must say walking along this stretch of river is up there with my favourite walk on the Regent’s Canal, as it has the same beautiful features. Crisp, blue water as far as the eye can see. Pretty houses on the route. Wonderful reflections in the water. Plenty of canal boats. And an abundance of greenery, with the marshes in between the river and the towpath. It’s so peaceful walking through it, and I’m very jealous of the people who have the river as their window views!

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The Lea Valley Walk
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The Lea Valley Walk
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The Lea Valley Walk
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The Lea Valley Walk

I’ll now leave the Lea Valley Walk to visit my final destination today, Springfield Park! Occupying 14.73 hectares (36.4 acres) of green land, the park is located in Upper Clapton in the Borough of Hackney. In Georgian era Springfield House stood on the main entrance to the park and by the mid-Victorian period housing estates in the area were developed.

However, in 1902 the private estates and land in the area were sold off, with the park put up for auction. A group of local businessmen saved the park and eventually the London County Council took over the responsibility of it. In 1905 the park was opened to the public!

I’ve discovered many parks on my walks, and they all seem to have their own unique features and are all different in some way. Springfield Park has a really steep hill and incline, something not seen in many other areas in London, and with the backdrop of the River Lea behind it, it certainly is a perfect way to end a walk!

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Springfield Park
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Springfield Park
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Springfield Park
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Springfield Park
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Springfield Park
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Behind Springfield Park

It has  been a wonderful walk exploring more of East London’s natural wonders and discovering the gems along the Lea Valley Walk! Hope you’ve enjoyed my walk, and please share your thoughts in the comments section below! You can catch me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too!

Until next time, have fun walking, and see you soon!

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2017

History of the Hackney Downs – London Gardens

History of Clapton Pond – Hackney

Map of the Lea Valley Walk – Cicerone

Information about the Lea Valley Walk – Londonist

History of Springfield Park – Destination Hackney

Holland Park to Meanwhile Gardens: Discovering One of London’s Most Scenic Places

Hello there! Thanks for joining me on my next adventure across London! Today’s walk begins in one of London’s prettiest places, Holland Park. From there I take a trip through Notting Hill and Portobello Road Market, before ending at Meanwhile Gardens and its lovely riverside view!

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Holland Park to Meanwhile Gardens

My journey begins in affluent and fashionable Holland Park located in the borough of Kensington & Chelsea.

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Entrance to Holland Park

The park is 22 hectares (54 acres) and opened to the public in 1952. From a woodland to fountains to gardens, Holland Park has it all!

The park used to be part of Holland House, a Jacobean mansion which was built between 1605 and 1608 for Sir Walter Cope. It was named after its second owner, the Earl of Holland, and during the 19th Century it became a hub for political and literacy activity. Over the years the building was altered, but in 1940 it was gutted by a fire as a result of a bomb during World War 2. The houses last private owner was the 6th Earl of Ilchester, until in 1952 it was bought by the London County Council.

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Holland House
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Holland House
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Part of Holland House in the Distance

Within the park sits a statue of English politician Lord Holland which was erected in 1926, and was the work of Victorian painter-sculptor, G.F. Watts, with help from J.E. Boeham.

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Lord Holland Statue

A walk through the grounds you pass many lovely gardens.

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Holland Park Gardens
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Holland Park Gardens

A statue donated by ‘The Friends of Holland Park’ in 1986 also sits within the gardens.

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The Friends of Holland Park Statue

One of my favourite features within the park is this stunning water fountain! You can’t beat the sound of trickling water!

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Holland Park Gardens
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Water Fountain within Holland Park

When you go through Holland Park it’s like being in a fairytale story, with its magical gardens, trees and water fountains!

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Pretty Holland Park

Another one of Holland Park’s distinctive and amazing features is the Japanese Garden, Kyoto Garden which has been there since 1991. The garden was installed as part of the Japan Festival in 1991 which celebrated the centenary of the Japan Society in Britain. It was built by the Kyoto Chamber of Commerce and presented to the Royal Borough of Kensington & Chelsea as a gift to commemorate the long-lasting friendship between Great Britain and Japan. And when you walk through it, you feel in such as pleasant peace of mind.

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Kyoto Gardens
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Kyoto Gardens
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Kyoto Gardens
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Kyoto Gardens

One of the gardens many wonders is this incredible waterfall!

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Kyoto Gardens Waterfall
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Koi Carp in the Gardens Waters
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Kyoto Gardens
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Kyoto Gardens

After being in perhaps one of the most relaxing and therapeutic places in London, my walk takes me past the colorful and scenic houses of Notting Hill.

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Houses of Notting Hill
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Houses of Notting Hill

My next stop is Portobello Road Market which has been present in the area for nearly 300 years and is one of the world’s most iconic and famous markets. The name ‘Portobello’ derives from Porto Bello Farm which was built in the area. Also the name Porto Bello itself derives from the town of Porto Bello in Panama which had been captured by the British from the Spanish in 1739 as part of the War of Jenkins’ Ear.

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Portobello Road Market

During the 18th and 19th centuries Portobello Road was just a lane that connected Notting Hill and Kensal Green. With the neighbouring Paddington area being dedicated to residential developments, shops and markets began to spring up in Portobello to accommodate the residents.

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Portobello Road Market

With more residential developments occurring in Portobello Road, local working class residents found employment in the area as domestic servants, labourers and other unskilled jobs.

Up until the 1940s Portobello Road Market only sold food and other essentials, but more ‘rag and bone’ men began to sell items and other bric-a-bac and antiques. It’s now antiques that Portobello Road Market is best known for with Saturday’s being its main day of trading.

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Portobello Road Market

Despite the market suffering a lack of investment during the 20th Century, the late 1980s saw the market go under a significant amount of gentrification. From being a run-down and shabby working class area, it transformed to a more affluent, fashionable and desirable place to be and live in.

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Nowadays with it being a more wealthy area, in addition to second-hand goods, antiques, household essentials, and food, the younger residents have brought vintage clothing and a more cutting edge appeal to the market.

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Portobello Road Market

It’s time to continue my walk onto my final destination of Meanwhile Gardens, but on my way I came across this really cool collection of drawings!

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Fiona Hawthorne’s Artwork

This wall of art celebrates 150 years of Portobello & Golborne Markets and the installation was by artist Fiona Hawthorne. All the artwork was commissioned by the borough of Kensington & Chelsea and with the support of Instituto Espanol Vicente Canada Blanch, the art will remain public on the wall.

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Fiona Hawthorne’s Artwork

All the sketches from Fiona Hawthorne illustrate what life is like within the Portobello and Golborne area during July 2015 and capture the rare, dynamic energy of Portobello Market and Golborne Road. These wonderful pieces of art definitely encapsulates the stalls, traders, characters, and moments perfectly!

My final destination is Meanwhile Gardens which is a community garden near Ladbroke Grove established in 1976, with the Regent’s Canal floating beside it.

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Meanwhile Gardens

A walk outside the gardens takes you along the riverside and to this beautiful stretch of water! If you continue to walk you eventually end up at Little Venice, and from there you can enjoy one of my previous walks – Little Venice to Abbey Road!

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Regent’s Canal
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Regent’s Canal
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Regent’s Canal

Well it has been a truly lovely walk where I’ve seen perhaps one of the most picturesque and peaceful places that London has to offer in Holland Park. As well as other hotspots of Notting Hill and Portobello Road Market. Thanks for reading and I hope you had fun following my journey! You can catch me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too!

I’ll see you soon for another walk through London!

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2017

History of Holland Park – Parks and Gardens

History of Holland Park – British History Online

Information about Holland Park – TimeOut London

History of Portobello Road Market – Portobello Road Market

Information about Meanwhile Gardens – Garden Visit 

Grosvenor Gardens to Knightsbridge: Exploring the Exclusive Side of London

Welcome one and all to another walk across London! This week I’ll be visiting the exclusive and wealthy side of the capital, as my journey begins in Grosvenor Gardens. From there I go via upmarket Belgravia to Sloane Square before finishing at one of the world’s most famous department stores, Harrods in Knightsbridge. So let’s grab the walking boots and go!

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Grosvenor Gardens to Knightsbridge

My walk starts in Upper Grosvenor Gardens which has only been open to the public recently, and with its plants and benches is the perfect place to relax. The name Grosvenor derives from the Grosvenor family who were landowners in the area.

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Grosvenor Gardens

One of the distinctive features within the garden is a sculpture of a Lioness chasing a Lesser Kudu. It was created by the famous animal sculptor Jonathan Kenworthy, and has been there since 2000 to mark the opening of the gardens to the people of Westminster. It certainly is an eye-catching aspect of the gardens which you don’t miss!

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Lioness and Lesser Kudu Sculpture

At one of the entrances also stands this war memorial with poppy wreaths laid in remembrance.

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War Memorial

Whenever you’re in a garden you normally only take in the plants, grass area and sculptures, however, the outer fencing has this really unique and stylish design!

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Fence on the Outside of the Gardens

It’s time to move onto my next location on today’s walk as I head for affluent Belgravia and Eaton Square. Now if you thought living in London was expensive, you’ve not seen anything yet! In December Eaton Square was given the honour of being the most expensive place to buy a home in the UK. The average home in this area costs a staggering £17 million! Some properties in the area have been on the market for as much as over £50 million! Looking at the size of the houses you can see why!

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Eaton Square
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Eaton Square

Opposite the houses sits some beautiful gardens too, which are private to the residents of the mansions!

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Eaton Square
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Eaton Square

I must say walking through all these expensive and fancy mansions is actually quite fun to get a glimpse of the high life! Though I’ll never be able to afford them, or you never know if this blog takes off and makes me a millionaire I might…. but for now strolling past them will have to do!

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Eaton Square

I leave the well-heeled Belgravia mansions to go onto my next stop, Sloane Square! Located in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, the square used to be called ‘Hans Town’ after Sir Hans Sloane whose estates owned the land at the time. The square was laid out in 1771 by architects Henry Holland Snr and Henry Holland Jnr.

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Sloane Square
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Sloane Square

Within the square sits The Venus Fountain which was sculptured in 1953 by  Gilbert Ledward. The life-sized bronze Venus is seen kneeling on top of a large vase whilst pouring water into a pool lined with light blue ceramic tiles. The Venus is sitting on a relief of King Charles II and his mistress, Nell Gywnn.

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The Venus Fountain
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The Venus Fountain

At the opposite end of The Venus Fountain you find a Royal Naval Air Service memorial which again has poppy wreaths laid out on it in remembrance.

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Royal Naval Air Service

Next to Sloane Square you’ll find the picturesque Parish Church of Holy Trinity Sloane Square which is an Anglican parish church built between 1888-1890, and designed by architect John Dando Sedding.

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The Parish Church of Holy Trinity Sloane Square

A walk along Sloane Street takes you to one of London’s secret hidden gems at Cadogan Place Gardens. Once known as the London Botanic Gardens, they were laid out at the end of the 18th century by William Sailsbury. Walking through the gardens feels like you’re in one of London’s Royal Parks or the countryside, not a small pretty garden near Knightsbridge. Within the gardens sits lawns, plants, hedges and sculptures, everything you’d expect from a beautiful garden! The more you walk through it, you discover lots of picturesque surprises!

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It’s time to move onto my final location in Knightsbridge, Harrods. To get there I pass many high-end brands from Gucci to Chanel and many other brands I don’t normally buy from!

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Street in Knightsbridge

One of Knightsbridge’s most recognisable stores is Harrods which was founded in 1834 by Charles Henry Harrod. The store is 20,000 m2  with 330 departments that covers 90,000 m2 of retail space. Harrods’ motto is Omnia Omnibus Ubique, which means “all things for all people, everywhere” in Latin! From clothing to electronics to jewellery to toys to furniture, it’s all there for you! I do love the distinctive green colouring of the branding and with its unique products makes it a huge tourist hot spot!

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Harrods
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Harrods
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Harrods

My walk has taken me through some of London’s richest and most exclusive areas, whether it’s the mansions of Belgravia to the gardens near Knightsbridge, it has been a trip through the capital’s upmarket side! Hope you’ve enjoyed reading my walk, and you can catch me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too!

Until next time, have a great week, and see you soon!

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2017

Information on Grosvenor Gardens – London is Cool

Information on Grosvenor Gardens – Secret London

Information on Grosvenor Gardens – My Parks Westminster

Information on Sloane Square – The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea

London’s Most Beautiful Fountains – Londonist

About The Parish Church of Holy Trinity Sloane Square – Holy Trinity Sloane Square

Information about Cadogan Place Gardens – London Gardens Trust

History of Harrods – Harrods