Shoreditch to Islington Green: Trendy, Traditional and Tranquil East London

Greetings to you all and thanks for coming along with me on another journey across the capital! Today’s walk begins in Shoreditch with a visit to Boxpark and Brick Lane, before taking me to The Geffrye Museum of the Home. I’ll then go to Haggerston Park, with a pleasant walk along the Regent’s Canal to Shoreditch Park, with my final stop of Islington Green!

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Shoreditch to Islington Green

My walk begins in swanky Shoreditch and at one of its fairly recent sights, Boxpark, which was installed in 2011 as the world’s first pop-up mall. Created by Roger Wade, the whole concept of the area was to refit and repurpose shipping containers into an independent and revolutionary retail experience which showcases fashion and creativity in a street setting.

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Boxpark Front View

The distinctive model of the park is an alternative set-up not just for customers, but also retailers who are on the hunt for more affordable space in the capital. With an array of brands and places to dine, the park illustrates the unique reputation that Shoreditch brings. The success of Boxpark Shoreditch has seen two others ‘pop up’, one in Wembley and another in Croydon. It’s certainly quite different to walking around a huge mall, and with space in London becoming more sought after, you expect niche and quaint places such as these to be launching in many other areas.

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Boxpark Brands!

Now it’s time to leave Boxpark and do a bit of a wander around a few other sights in Shoreditch. Located in East London, Brick Lane was formerly known as Whitechapel Lane, though its name today derives from the brick and tile manufacturers who used the brick earth deposits in the 15th century.

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Bustling Brick Lane

Brewing began in Brick Lane around 1680, with one such brewer named Joseph Truman beginning his brewing there in 1683, and his family would go on to establish the sizeable Black Eagle Brewery on Brick Lane. The old building is still prominent in the Shoreditch skyline today, with it being used for food markets and events.

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Well-Known Truman Brewery

The Brick Lane market was first developed in the 17th century for the selling of fruit and vegetables. The area saw a wave of immigration throughout the 18th and 19th century with French Huguenots, the Irish and many people of the Jewish faith settling there.

The theme of immigration has continued into the 20th century with many Bangladeshi immigrants now residing in the area. It’s now the hub of London’s Bangladeshi community, which reenforced Brick Lane’s reputation of being famed for its many authentic curry restaurants. If you go there on a Sunday, which I did, the markets are thriving with a range of stalls selling a variety of clothes, handbags, jewellery and vintage, chic boutiques. 

The Brick Lane and Shoreditch area is seen by many to be quite edgy and hip, and whilst you walk around there past the many lovely independent coffee shops, there’s loads of street art which demonstrates the trendy reputation.

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Funky but Scary!
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All the Colours of the Rainbow!
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Not sure what this means?!

Shoreditch really is one of the most unique parts of London with it being a cultural hub of creativity and diversity through its art, food, people and places.

It’s time to leave Brick Lane, and head towards a peaceful little area called Arnold Circus, no clowns here though! The housing development within the Boundary Estate was opened in 1900 which makes it one of the earliest social housing schemes built by a local Government authority. The bandstand within the circus has the honour of having Grade II listed status.

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Arnold Circus Bandstand

Leaving the gardens, a walk towards Hoxton brings you to the very picturesque Geffrye Museum of the Home which was established in 1914 and aims to inspire everyone about the multiple meanings of the home from 1600 to the present day. To do this the museum showcases displays of urban living rooms, gardens, special exhibitions and events.

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The Geffrye Museum of the Home

Located on a former almshouse, a house built originally by a charitable person for poor people to live in, the building was developed in 1714 with the bequest of the former Lord Mayor of London and Master of the Ironmongers’ Company. The almshouse had fourteen houses with each having four rooms which provided retirement homes for up to 56 pensioners.

By the 18th century the area was mainly rural with market gardens to supply Londoners with fresh vegetables and herbs. During the 19th century with London expanding the area became home to the centre for London’s furniture and clothing trades, with the farmland being replaced with housing, factories and workshops.

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Glorious Grounds of the Museum

The Shoreditch area by 1910 had become one of London’s most heavily populated places and with serve overcrowding and little sanitation, the Ironmonger’s Company relocated and as a result sold the almshouses & gardens to the London County Council in 1912.

With the arts and crafts movement gaining momentum in the area, the location was converted into a museum in 1914 to inspire and educate people about the local furniture trade. With the furniture industry moving away from Shoreditch, the focus turned to collections around the home. As the years went on, the museum increased its collections of paintings, furniture and decorated arts, with a period garden being added in the 20th century.  The focus of the museum today centres on the home and home life reflected in changes in society, patterns of behaviour, style, fashion and taste.

The area does have a really grand and historical feel to it, and it’s quite hard to believe such a glorious area is hidden within bustling Shoreditch!

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Grand Gardens

It’s now time to carry on my walk to my next destination of Haggerston Park which is located in the south-west corner of Hackney.  Originally created in the 1950s, and extended in the 1980s, the park is carved out from the area of derelict housing, a tile manufacturer and the old Shoreditch gasworks. Occupying 6 hectares (15 acres) the scenic park includes many open green spaces as well as many football pitches. It really is the perfect place if you require a quiet spot for a picnic or just to relax, and the area is pretty vast for a park right within the Shoreditch area.

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Tranquil Haggerston Park
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Peaceful Paradise!
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The Park’s Football Pitches
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Picnic Perfect!

Taking a detour out of the park I’ll now head off to Shoreditch Park, however, to get there I’ll need to walk along one of my favourite stretches of water, the Regent’s Canal! My walks have frequently taken me along this stretch of water, as it goes through a vast majority of places and sights through the capital. To find out more about its history, check out my walk from King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath!

I recall the first time I walked along the Regent’s Canal back in 2014 having just stumbled across it when walking through Shoreditch, and since then it has always been one of my go-to walks and places to explore. It’s both a quiet and pretty place to stroll along with so much to see along it, whether that’s the boats, buildings, parks, locks or the lovely nature, it’s the place to be for a London walk. You can’t help but fall in love with it!

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One of my Favourite Places!
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Down by the Lovely River
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Beautiful Boats of the Canal

I’ll now take a detour off the canal, and head to Shoreditch Park which at 7.1 hectares (17 acres) is one of the borough’s largest parks serving the South of Hackney.  During the Regency Era and subsequent creation of the Regent’s Canal, the area was originally open fields and was developed into terraced housing for workers and families. However, during the Blitz and later air-raids in the early 1940s the area was badly damaged.

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Splendid Shoreditch Park

In 1945 the damaged homes from the bombs were cleared with temporary housing erected there as a stop-gap for the homeless families during the war. These were only designed to be there for a short-term basis, and nearly 20 years on they were removed in 1964, with the site being redeveloped and cleared between 1964 and 1973.

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Maybe the Only Park in London to Spell out its Name?!

The park we enjoy today has a number of facilities for sport, adventure & children’s playgrounds and an outdoor beach volleyball court. Every year the park is home to the Shoreditch Festival which offers live music, food and entertainment.

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Fun for all the Family!

I’ll now rejoin the Regent’s Canal and head onto my final stop on my walk, Islington Green!

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The Familiar Boats of the Regent’s Canal
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Autumnal Wonders

Based near Angel station, Islington Green is a small triangle of open land which marks the Northern boundary between the modern district of Angel and Islington. At the heart of the green is the Statue of Sir Hugh Myddleton (1560-1631) sculptured by John Thomas. Myddleton had a major role in constructing the original terminus for the New River, which was an artificial waterway in England opened in 1613 to supply London with fresh drinking water from the River Lea and Chadwell Springs and Amwell Springs. It’s so fitting that there is a statue for someone who did quite a remarkable job in helping provide such a significant aspect to people’s lives of clean drinking water!

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Statue of Hugh Myddelton

Well that’s all for today’s walk exploring the East and Inner sides of London, where you can discover everything from art, to museums, to parks, it really is a walk that would cater for everyone! Thanks for coming along on my walk and in the meantime you can catch me on Twitter and Instagram and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too and have a read of my other walks! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger. © Copyright 2018

Boxpark: History of Boxpark

Brick Lane: History of Brick Lane

Geffrye Museum: History of the Geffrye Museum

Haggerston Park: History of Haggerston Park

Shoreditch Park: History of Shoreditch Park

Islington Green: Information about Islington Green

Little Venice to Abbey Road: Sporting and Musical Landmarks

Welcome one and all 🙂 Last week my walk ended in Italian Gardens, and the theme of Italy continues as this week I start in Venice, well Little Venice! No Italian adventures just yet! I’ll then go along my favourite stretch of water, the Regent’s Canal, before going past The Liberal Jewish Synagogue and St John’s Wood Church. In between that I’ll be passing by Lord’s Cricket Ground and ending at a musical landmark, Abbey Road. So, let’s begin the journey!

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Little Venice to Abbey Road

Located near Paddington and Maida Vale, Little Venice is a scenic and very picturesque riverside area. Its history can be traced back to the 1810s when a pool was created where the Regent’s Canal and the Paddington arm of the Grand Junction Canal met. Back then it was known as the Paddington Broadwater.

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There are a couple of accounts as to where the name ‘Little Venice’ was coined. One of which was from poet Lord Byron who compared this area of Paddington to Venice. An alternative origin came from another poet Robert Browning. He referenced it while living in nearby Warwick Crescent between 1862 and 1887. This lead to the island in the middle christened Browning’s Island. It wasn’t until after the Second World War that it became Venice, and the 1950s until it was known as Little Venice.

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The surrounding affluent area has large houses with notable residents including entrepreneur Richard Branson and singer Robbie Williams. Around Little Venice you can find riverside cafes and restaurants whist enjoying venues such as the Canal Cafe Theatre and the Puppet Theatre Barge.

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The Canal and River Trust Offices

By the bridge in Little Venice sits the offices of the Canal & River Trust who’re a charity that’s responsible for taking care of 2,000 miles of waterways across England and Wales. And who we have to provide great appreciation to for the wonderful canal walks we have within London!

From peaceful Little Venice I take a walk along the Regent’s Canal past the boats and bridges of London’s loveliest riverside views.

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Walking along this stretch of water you could easily feel like you’re in Amsterdam, with the picturesque plants and pathways. This is the kind of walk that you can enjoy on either a cold winter’s day, when I went on it, or just as much on a warm summer’s day. I think every great walk, not just in London, has to have some form of river or canal in it. Over the weeks and months that I’ve been walking, there have been, and will be, walks that form a lot of the Regent’s Canal. These have so far included King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath and Mile End Park to London Fields!

It’s time to say goodbye (not to the walk, don’t worry..!), but to my canal walk as I continue my journey to Abbey Road.  As I do this, I passed this beautiful estate in Maida Vale! Imagine living in or even opposite it!

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My walk takes me past this rather lovely and distinct building which is The Liberal Jewish Synagogue. Founded in 1911, it’s the oldest and largest Liberal Synagogue in the UK.

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Opposite it is probably the most famous cricket ground and well-known sporting venues in the world, Lord’s Cricket Ground! Now being a fan of cricket, this stop on my walk is extra special!

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Photo credit: London Town

Known as the ‘Home of Cricket’, Lord’s Cricket Ground’s history can be traced back to 1787 when the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC) was founded. Before a ground was built aristocrats and nobleman would play cricket in White Conduit Fields in Islington. However, as London’s population grew and the need for more space so crowds could watch them play, they approached White Conduit CC’s bowler, Thomas Lord. They asked him to create a new private ground.

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Photo credit: London Town

Lord was an ambitious entrepreneur and leased a ground on Dorset Fields in Marylebone. It staged its first match between Middlesex and Essex on the 31st May 1787, and the Marylebone Cricket Club was formed. A year later the Laws of the Game were laid down, which notably referenced the size of the pitch (22 yards), and how players could be given out. Even today the MCC still remains in charge of the Laws of the Game across the entire world.

The MCC located to Marylebone Bank near Regent’s Park between 1811 and 1813, before moving to the ground we see today in St John’s Wood in 1814. Today, the ground is home to Middlesex County Cricket Club and hosts England national matches. It also hosts many corporate events as well as the game of Real Tennis.

Walking past the ground you see the W. G. Grace Memorial Gates which were erected in 1923, and gained Grade II listed status in 1996. Designed by architect Sir Herbert Baker they were a tribute to W.G. Grace, who is widely regarded as the pioneer of the game and one of the greatest ever players.

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W.G. Grace Memorial Gates

Along the outside of the ground you come to the Bicentenary Gates which were presented by the Duke of Westminster in memory of Viscount Cobham in 1987.

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Bicentenary Gates
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Lovely Wall Display Outside the Ground

From cricket to churches, as my walk takes me to St John’s Wood Church which was designed by architect Thomas Hardwick and completed in 1814. When the Church opened the celebrations were held within the new Pavilion at Lord’s Cricket Ground!

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Within the roundabout opposite the church sits the St Mary-le-Bone War Memorial which is a tribute to the men and women who sacrificed their lives in both World War One (1914-1918) and World War Two (1939-1945). The bronze statue is of St George in full armour on horseback slaying a dragon and was dedicated in 1936.

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Saint Mary-le-Bone War Memorial

It’s now time to move onto my final destination today, and quite possibly the world’s most famous crossing, Abbey Road! The Abbey Road Studios began their life as a sixteen-room house and were bought by EMI in 1929. They opened in 1931 with many different studios to accommodate all the varieties of musicians that used them, from orchestras, to string quarters, to soloists.

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Abbey Road Studios

The Beatles were signed by EMI’s Parlophone label in 1962, and made their first recording in the studios in the same year. Ninety percent of their recordings were done in the Abbey Road Studios. Other notable artists who recorded there were Pink Floyd, Cliff Richard, The Hollies, and even scores for four Star Wars films!

However, the studio only gained fame when The Beatles named their second-to-last album Abbey Road which was released in 1969. Its cover has become one of the world’s most recognisable images. This iconic image sees  John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr walking across the zebra crossing outside the studio.

Originally, the plan for the album cover was to charter a private jet to the Himalayas and shoot it at foothills of Mount Everest. However, EMI were so desperate to get the product out they went for a simple option of doing the image outside the studios. The photo was taken by Iain Macmillan on a ladder in the middle of the street whilst a policeman stopped traffic.

It was photographed at 11.30AM on the 8th August 1969, taking 10 minutes to do! Far more cheaper and simpler than their original plan! Did you know that six photos were taken, and it was the fifth one that was used. Also the guy in the background by the car was an American tourist called Paul Cole, who didn’t even know it was The Beatles!

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The Famous Cover (Photo Credit: The Beatles)

In 2010, however, the cash-strapped EMI were considering selling the studios, but a few days later it was awarded Grade II historical status to help preserve it. Today, the crossing is a huge tourist attraction with many taking photos of themselves walking across it like the Fab Four did. And whilst I was there taking my pics, many frustrated drivers went past with people standing in the middle of the road! It’s a strange feeling when you’re there as you don’t really feel like you’re next to a historical landmark, but its musical significance is massive.

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The Abbey Road Zebra Crossing
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The Wall Outside the Studios
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The Abbey Road Street Sign near the Studios

It has been a walk where I’ve seen the beauty of Little Venice and stopped by landmarks of the sporting and music world’s! I hope you had a great time joining me on my walk, and please let me know your thoughts below, I’d love to hear them! For more of the London Wlogger you can give me a follow on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and don’t forget to sign up to my blog too 🙂

Stay tuned for another walk through London next week!

Mile End Park to London Fields: Exploring Parks of the 19th & 21st Century

Hello there! Thanks for joining me for another walking adventure across the city of London! This week I’m going to be exploring East London, where my journey begins at Mile End Park. From there I’ll take the beautiful Regent’s Canal walk to the amazing Victoria Park, before finishing in the very peaceful London Fields.

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Mile End Park to London Fields

Based in East London, Mile End Park is a relatively new addition to London having been opened in 2004 as part of the Millennium Commission, who called for suitable projects to be created as a way to mark the millennium.

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However, plans for a park in Mile End date back to 1943 when Sir Patrick Abercrombie mooted them in his 1944 ‘Greater London Plan’. The site has had development done to it before the park we see today, including trees being planted, a playing field opened in 1952 as well as the East London Stadium being built and opened in 1966.

In 1985 the land became the responsibility of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. By 1995 the Tower Hamlets Environment Trust, the East London Partnership, and the London Borough of Tower successful got Millennium funding worth £12.33m.

The aim of the new park was to make it a sustainable area which was built and would benefit the local community and act as a catalyst for regional regeneration. The area includes many green spaces, a playground, Ecology Park, Art Pavilion, cafe, and outdoor gallery space. I only discovered this gem a few years back when I was walking a long The Regent’s Canal, and it’s totally worth the visit!

And speaking of The Regent’s Canal, it’s time to join it, as we make our way along our journey. The Regent’s Canal was opened in 1801 to connect the Grand Junction Canal’s Paddington Arm with the Thames at Limehouse. For more information on the history of The Regent’s Canal, check out my previous walk, King’s Cross to Hampstead Heath!

My pleasant walk along the Regent’s Canal takes me under numerous bridges, and its beauty demonstrates why this is my favourite stretch of walking!

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A short walk past Mile End lock which is upstream.

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Mile End Lock

My route takes me to one of the aforementioned developments within the Mile End project, The Art Pavilion.

This pavilion provides a stunning gallery space with grass and the small lake overlooking the area. It’s a popular place for exhibitions and installations, and there aren’t many places in London which have this cute feel and unique view.

From culture to a canal, as I rejoin the Regent’s Canal once again passing through the tranquil riverside.

This takes me to the Old Fort Lock where the Regent’s Canal meets the Hertford Union Canal.

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Old Fort Lock

I’ll now take a detour off the Regent’s Canal to make my way to the truly wonderful Victoria Park.

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Lakeside view at Victoria Park

Opened in 1845, Victoria Park is located in the East of London bordering Bethnal Green, South Hackney, and Cambridge Heath. The park has 86.18 hectares of open space with a riverside cafe and many marvellous lakes.

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Bridge to enter one of the Park’s islands

Back in 1839, the Annual Report of the Registrar General of Births, Deaths and Marriages noted that the East End of London had a higher mortality rate than the rest of the city due to overcrowding, insanitary conditions, and polluted air. One way to reduce the amount of deaths and extend people’s lives was to create a park. Over 30,000 residents signed a petition, and in 1841 London’s first public park to be built specifically for people had begun! Hence, Victoria Park is also known as the ‘People’s Park’.

The Government bought land that had formally been used for market gardens, grazing, and gravel digging. The man behind the design for Victoria Park was James Pennethorne who was an architect to the Commissioners of Woods and Forests.

A boating lake with three islands was also created with The Chinese Pagoda sitting within one of these. It was originally the entrance at Hyde Park Corner to the Chinese Exhibition between 1842 and 1843, however, this summerhouse later moved to its current position in Victoria Park.

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The Chinese Pagoda

A walk along the vast area of Victoria Park takes you to many open green spaces, and a nice little seating area!

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Nothing like a peaceful park!
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Lovely seating area in the park

One of the distinct monuments within the park is that of the Burdett-Coutts Memorial Drinking-Fountain which was designed by H.A. Darbishire and has been in the park since 1862.

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The Burdett-Coutts Memorial Drinking Fountain

The fountain made from pink marble, granite, and stone, has a distinctive cupola, ornamental slate roof, four clock-faces, Gothic arches, and inscriptions.

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It was gift by wealthy philanthropist Angela Burdett-Coutts to the people who visited Victoria Park and gave residents clean drinking water too.

In 1872 the park was extended on land that was originally going to be used for residential developments. A well-loved and valuable institution to the people in London, especially those in the East, the park has Grade II listed status. In 2011 the park had major restorations and improvements done to it with £12m being spent by Tower Hamlets Council, and I think it’s well worth it!

The park today hosts numerous events including the Lovebox Music Festival, and is a popular attraction for many who live in the East End.

After taking in the splendour of Victoria Park I’m now going to rejoin the Regent’s Canal as I make my way to the final destination, London Fields.

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On the edge of Victoria Park sits the Regent’s Canal

As you walk along the Regent’s Canal you come across these distinctive gasometers near Bethnal Green which have been there since the 1850s. There aren’t many of these around in London these days, so it’s great to see these iconic ones still going strong along the river.

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Gasometers near Bethnal Green

The walk up the streets takes me to London Fields, a 31-acre park located in south-central Hackney. It was first recorded by its name London Field in 1540, though there has been pasture land adjoining nearby Cambridge Heath since 1275.

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London Fields

The land was used by drovers to pasture their livestock before taking them to market in London. By the late 19th century, its name was pluralised to ‘London Fields’.

Council flats began to be built in the surrounding area to replace the slums in the early 1930s. Today, the park has a playground, cricket pitch, a lido, and a tennis court, and if you want a nice, quiet area to enjoy your lunch, it’s perfect!

My journey has taken me from two parks, one opened in the 21st century and the other in the 19th century, taking in one of London’s most popular walks along the Regent’s Canal. I hope you’ve enjoyed taking in some of the capital’s great green spaces! Don’t forget to follow me on TwitterInstagram and Facebook, and to sign up to my blog too 🙂

Stay tuned for another walk through London next week! 🙂

Sources: (not the food sauces)

All photos taken by London Wlogger unless credit given. © Copyright 2017

About Mile End Park – London Gardens Online

About The Art Pavilion and images of the inside – Tower Hamlets Gov

The Old Fort Lock – Canal and River Trust

History of Victoria Park – Tower Hamlets Gov

Information about the Chinese Pogoda – London Gardens Trust

History of Burdett-Coutts Memorial Drinking-Fountain – The Victorian Web

Bethnal Green Gasworks – The Guardian 

History of London Fields – British History Online

History of London Fields – Hidden London